The embryonic limb cells of snakes can be turned into hemipenes. "If you ectopically transplant this cloaca into either limb- or tail-bud cells," explained the study's lead author, "these cells respond in a way that reflects their development being redirected to a genital fate." A person's belief in free will is negatively correlated with how urgently he or she needs to urinate. | Harper's Magazine

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The embryonic limb cells of snakes can be turned into hemipenes. “If you ectopically transplant this cloaca into either limb- or tail-bud cells,” explained the study’s lead author, “these cells respond in a way that reflects their development being redirected to a genital fate.” A person’s belief in free will is negatively correlated with how urgently he or she needs to urinate.

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The embryonic limb cells of snakes can be turned into hemipenes. “If you ectopically transplant this cloaca into either limb- or tail-bud cells,” explained the study’s lead author, “these cells respond in a way that reflects their development being redirected to a genital fate.” A person’s belief in free will is negatively correlated with how urgently he or she needs to urinate.

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