Urologists came up with a technique for surgically correcting micropenis, a condition in which the penis fails to develop properly. Men who suffer from micropenis are unable to have sexual intercourse or to urinate standing up. The new technique, known as phalloplasty, involves taking skin from the forearm and shaping it into a four- to five-inch penis, with the original glans transplanted to preserve erogenous sensation. | Harper's Magazine

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Urologists came up with a technique for surgically correcting micropenis, a condition in which the penis fails to develop properly. Men who suffer from micropenis are unable to have sexual intercourse or to urinate standing up. The new technique, known as phalloplasty, involves taking skin from the forearm and shaping it into a four- to five-inch penis, with the original glans transplanted to preserve erogenous sensation.

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Urologists came up with a technique for surgically correcting micropenis, a condition in which the penis fails to develop properly. Men who suffer from micropenis are unable to have sexual intercourse or to urinate standing up. The new technique, known as phalloplasty, involves taking skin from the forearm and shaping it into a four- to five-inch penis, with the original glans transplanted to preserve erogenous sensation.

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