Combat High·

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America’s addiction to war
Illustration (detail) by John Ritter

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Comforting Myths·

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Notes from a purveyor
Artwork by Mahmood Sabzi

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The Sound of Madness·

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Can we treat psychosis by listening to the voices in our heads?
Painting (detail) by Carlo Zinelli

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Looking for Calley·

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How a young journalist untangled the riddle of My Lai
Photograph © Bettmann/Getty Images

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The Last Best Place·

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A Syrian refugee family’s search for home
Illustration (detail) by Danijel Žeželj

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Average amount Microsoft spends each month assisting people who need to change their passwords:

$2,000,000

Chimpanzees who join new groups with inferior nut-cracking techniques will abandon their superior techniques in order to fit in.

Trump leaves the Iran nuclear deal, Ebola breaks out in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and scientists claim that Pluto is still a planet.

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Weekly Review — May 15, 2018, 11:14 am

Weekly Review

US president Donald Trump withdrew the United States from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, which limited Iranian nuclear capabilities, and then reintroduced sanctions on the country, despite ten International Atomic Energy Agency reports finding that Iran had upheld its end of the deal. “We did not talk about a plan B,” said a State Department official.[1][2][3] Iran fired twenty rockets at Israeli forces in the Golan Heights, and Israel bombed fifty Iranian targets in Syria.[4][5] Gina Haspel, Trump’s nominee for director of the Central Intelligence Agency, was questioned by the Senate Intelligence Committee about her oversight of a CIA “black site” …

Art, Monday Gallery — May 14, 2018, 12:33 pm

Homage, a painting by Bill Scott, whose work was on view in April at Hollis Taggart Galleries, in New York City. Courtesy the artist and Hollis Taggart Galleries, New York City

Publisher's Note — May 14, 2018, 10:44 am

The Comedy

“France has lowered herself to the status of a stamp or seal in order to ‘reassure’ the American Establishment that its loutish leader isn’t entirely mad.”

Editor's Note — May 10, 2018, 3:50 pm

Inside the June Issue

Seymour M. Hersh, Zora Neale Hurston, Rabih Alameddine, and more

Weekly Review — May 9, 2018, 4:25 pm

Weekly Review

US president Donald Trump’s newly hired personal lawyer Rudolph Giuliani, a former New York City mayor who was once filmed at a charity event dressed as a woman and calling Trump a “dirty boy” for touching his fake breasts and who was reportedly not hired to work in the White House when Trump initially took office because the president-elect thought he was falling asleep in meetings and drinking too much, told reporters that he was “aware” and “intelligent” because he “handled” cases involving “cyber matters” and “went through 9/11,” and made a series of television appearances in which he said …

Art, Monday Gallery — May 7, 2018, 4:45 pm

An untitled photograph by Christine Collins, whose work is on view at Panopticon Gallery, in Boston.

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The Wizard of Q

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Punching the Clock

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Report — From the June 2013 issue

How to Make Your Own AR-15

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"Gun owners have long been the hypochondriacs of American politics. Over the past twenty years, the gun-rights movement has won just about every battle it has fought; states have passed at least a hundred laws loosening gun restrictions since President Obama took office. Yet the National Rifle Association has continued to insist that government confiscation of privately owned firearms is nigh. The NRA’s alarmism helped maintain an active membership, but the strategy was risky: sooner or later, gun guys might have realized that they’d been had. Then came the shootings at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado, and at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, followed swiftly by the nightmare the NRA had been promising for decades: a dedicated push at every level of government for new gun laws. The gun-rights movement was now that most insufferable of species: a hypochondriac taken suddenly, seriously ill."

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