Annie Dillard

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Annie Dillard was a contributing editor to Harper’s Magazine from 1973 to 1985, with a brief hiatus in 1982.

Dillard’s first contribution to Harper’s was sent to the editors as an unsolicited manuscript. “Monster in a Mason Jar: The lethal liturgy of the praying mantis” (August 1973) was the first of four excerpts from Pilgrim at Tinker Creek (1974) to appear in the magazine. The book was published by Harper’s Magazine Press in 1974, when Dillard was twenty-nine, and won the Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction in the same year. “Pilgrim is really a book of theology,” Dillard told an editor at the magazine in 1974. “It’s the result of one year’s walking around and thinking about what kind of god gave us this kind of world. I decided that it must have been a very carefree, exuberant one, saying ‘Here, have a tulip! Have a beetle! Have another beetle!’”

Dillard’s first book was the poetry collection Tickets for a Prayer Wheel (1974). Among her nonfiction works are Living by Fiction (1982); Teaching a Stone to Talk (1982); An American Childhood (1987), which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; and For the Time Being (1999), an excerpt of which appeared in the January 1988 issue of the magazine. Dillard also wrote two novels: The Living (1992), excerpts of which were published in the November 1978 and August 1991 issues, and The Maytrees (2007), which was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction.

Dillard taught at Wesleyan University from 1979 to 2000. She serves on the usage panel of the American Heritage Dictionary, and paints.

Fiction — From the November 2003 issue

The two of them

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Readings — From the June 2002 issue

This is the life

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Article — From the January 1998 issue

The wreck of time

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Taking our century’s measure

Readings — From the August 1995 issue

Signals at sea

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Fiction — From the August 1991 issue

A trip to the mountains

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Readings — From the August 1990 issue

Observations and experiments

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Fiction — From the September 1989 issue

Ship in a bottle

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Readings — From the June 1989 issue

Writing back

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Readings — From the January 1985 issue

Forest & shore

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Readings — From the September 1984 issue

With the Chinese at Disneyland

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Article — From the August 1980 issue

Is art all there is? Creators of the world

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Fiction — From the November 1978 issue

The living

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A story

Article — From the December 1977 issue

Mirages

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Poetry — From the October 1976 issue

Monarchs in the field

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Article — From the May 1976 issue

The death of a moth

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Fiction — From the January 1976 issue

A Christmas story

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Article — From the October 1975 issue

On a hill far away

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Article — From the May 1975 issue

Innocence in the Galapagos

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Wraparound — From the March 1975 issue

The falling leaves

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Wraparound — From the November 1974 issue

Tales of grandeur, tales of risk

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