Privacy Policy

Updated: 12/10/18

Harper’s Magazine (“Harper’s”) takes the privacy and security of personal information very seriously. As such, we have prepared the following Privacy Policy to provide you with information about how your data is collected, used, shared, transferred, and protected as a result of your interaction with https://harpers.org (the “Site”). If you disagree with any of the provisions described below, your remedy is to stop using the Site immediately.

Legal Basis of Data Processing: Harper’s processes your information under one or more of the following legal bases:

  • With your valid affirmative consent;
  • To fulfill a contract with you; and/or
  • As necessary for the purposes of the legitimate interests pursued by Harper’s or by a third party, except where such interests are overridden by your privacy interests or fundamental rights and freedoms.

Information Collection and Use

Visitors to the Site can browse without becoming registered users. We do not collect personal information from these non-registered Visitors. We do assign each non-registered Visitor a secure code to limit them to one free pdf story per month.

When you interact with the Site, we may ask you to provide your name, email address and mailing address in connection with subscribing with us and establishing an online subscriber account. We use this personal information you provide us to deliver you the content you subscribe for and to contact you regarding your subscription and other related offerings, which may include our newsletter and, from time to time, promotional events. We also track the number of sessions you’re using at once, as well as the number of articles and pages you are downloading in order to keep people from abusing our system or giving away their account information. This means that if you and all the other monks in the monastery want to read Harper’s online using one account, we’ll be forced to cut you off. We use information about what articles you’re reading in only two ways: to track abuse and to see what articles are popular on the website. We collect your IP address as part of this process.   

We sometimes sell or rent portions of our postal mailing list to other magazines, publications, fund raisers, and catalogs. We don’t do much of it, and we don’t let just anyone use our list. If you want to be removed, send an email to optout@harpers.org. Make sure to include your account number (it’s on your mailing label and starts with the letters PRS), the name under which you subscribed, and your full mailing address.

We also collect certain non-personal information such as your browsing history on the Site, the length of time spent on certain pages, the website Uniform Resource Locator (“URL”) from the website you were visiting before coming to this Site, which URL you next visit, device type, what browser you are using, Internet service provider, date/time of visit information and your operating system. We will use the non-personal information we collect to conduct statistical analysis of our Site, to troubleshoot service issues or interruptions, to update and improve the Site, and to understand the demographics of our Users and their browsing habits. We do not link this information to you personally.

It is your decision to use the Site, and, as such, any provision of this personal information is completely voluntary. You may decline to submit any personal information for any of our services or products. Please note that this may result in the inability to provide certain services or products to you.

Cookies 

Cookies are small files that are sent to and stored in your computer by the websites you visit. Cookies are stored in your browser’s file directory. Cookies may be stored only for the time you are in a given site or they may remain stored in your browser for a defined period of time beyond your current session. Cookies work in combination with content within the website itself, to capture and remember information. To learn more about these technologies and how they work, please see www.allaboutcookies.org.

We use cookies and other similar technologies (such as web beacons and pixels) to collect and process non-personal information.

You can choose to have your computer warn you each time a cookie is being sent, or you can choose to turn off all cookies. You can review the options available to manage cookies in your browser. One option is to disable, or turn-off, all cookies. If you turn cookies off, you may not be able to browse the Sites. If you disable certain kinds of cookies, some aspects of our Site may not function properly or as well.

Advertising Services

We contract with third-party advertising networks to track real time site usage to determine the effectiveness of certain advertising campaigns in driving traffic to the Site, to pitch advertising based on the location of the Site visitors, and to place advertising on our Site. We do not share personal information with these networks. We do use advertising management software that remembers who you are between visits.

Information Sharing

We may share personal information to the following entities and/or for the following reasons:

  • We may partner with other companies in order to provide our Users with additional benefits. In the event that we enter into such a partnership, we may share your personal information with those partners. If we share personal information, we will require that such partners use the personal information for the limited purpose for which we provide it, maintain reasonable security measures for the protection of such information, and comply with the provisions as outlined in this Privacy Policy.
  • Law Enforcement. Occasionally we may be required by law enforcement or judicial authorities to provide personal information. We will disclose personal information upon receipt of a court order, subpoena, warrant, or other legal process to the extent necessary to meet legal, national security, public interest, or law enforcement obligations. We fully cooperate with law enforcement agencies in identifying those who use our Site for illegal activities. We reserve the right to report to law enforcement agencies any activities that we in good faith believe to be unlawful.
  • In the event we enter into an agreement to be purchased by another company or to merge with another company, we may share personal information with that company. We will require that such purchasers continue to comply with the provisions as outlined in this Privacy Policy.

We may also share non-personal information with select third parties, such as our advertisers, for purposes of serving you with customized promotions. If you would like to learn more about the sharing of non-personal information for purposes of providing customized advertisements or promotions, please visit http://www.aboutads.info/consumers/.

Links to Third Party Sites

We provide links to third party websites that may be of interest to you. We are not responsible for the collection, use, or sharing of your personal information once you leave our Site and follow a link to one of these third party websites. Please consult each linked website’s privacy policy for a description of how the website collects, uses, and shares your information.

Children’s Information

The Site is not intended for children under the age of 13 years old. We do not knowingly collect information from children under the age of 13. If we discover that we have information from a child under the age of 13, we will delete it immediately. If you believe that a child under the age of 13 may have provided his or her information to us, please contact us using the contact information below.

Do Not Track

We do not track personal information about your online activities over time and across third-party Web sites or online services. We do not allow third parties to collect personal information about your online activities over time and across different Web sites when you use our Service. As a result, we do not respond to Web browser “do not track” signals.

How You Can Access and Control Your Personal Data

You have the following rights with respect to our processing of your personal information:

(1) access to your personal information that we process;

(2) correction of any errors in your personal information;

(3) to withdraw consent previously provided;

(4) to object to our processing of your personal information;

(5) in cases where (a) your objection to our processing of your personal information is not overridden by our legitimate interest in continuing the processing, (b) our processing of your personal information is based on your express consent that you subsequently withdraw, (c) your personal information is no longer necessary for the purpose for which we originally collected it, (d) we are processing personal information for direct marketing purposes and you object, or (e) legal obligations require it, the erasure of your personal information; and

(6) to take your personal information provided by express consent or for the performance of a contract from us with you.

To exercise these rights, or to remove yourself from our mailing list for catalogs or emails, please contact us via email at: helpdesk@harpers.org. Please include your name and mailing address in the message. If you would like to no longer receive emails from us, please click the ‘unsubscribe’ link included in all promotional emails sent by us.

Retention

We will retain your personal information for as long as is required to fulfill the purposes for which the information is processed or for other valid reasons to retain your personal information (for example to comply with our legal obligations, resolve disputes, or enforce our agreements). 

Cross-Border Transfer of Data

We are located in the United States. If you are not a resident of the United States, your country’s laws governing data collection and use may differ from those in the United States; in particular, the United States may not provide the same level of protections as those in your own country. By using the Site or providing your personal information to us, you are transferring your information to the United States, and you consent to the transfer, retention, and processing of such data in the United States. If you do not agree with such transfer, retention and processing in the United States, please do not use the Site. 

Security

We understand the importance of information security and will take reasonable measures to protect the security and confidentiality of your information. Please understand that no measures can guarantee 100% security.

Changes to this Privacy Policy

We reserve the right to make changes to this Privacy Policy. We will post changes directly to this Privacy Policy, so it is your responsibility to check back here from time to time to review this Privacy Policy. If we make a material change in the type of information we collect or its use, we will provide advance notice of such change, and obtain your consent for the new collection or use, as required by law.

Contact Information

If you have any questions or concerns about this Privacy Policy, please contact us using the information below:

helpdesk@harpers.org

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

October 2019

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

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Constitution in Crisis·

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America’s Constitution was once celebrated as a radical and successful blueprint for democratic governance, a model for fledgling republics across the world. But decades of political gridlock, electoral corruption, and dysfunction in our system of government have forced scholars, activists, and citizens to question the document’s ability to address the thorniest issues of modern ­political life.

Does the path out of our current era of stalemate, minority rule, and executive abuse require amending the Constitution? Do we need a new constitutional convention to rewrite the document and update it for the twenty-­first century? Should we abolish it entirely?

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Good Bad Bad Good·

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About fifteen years ago, my roommate and I developed a classification system for TV and movies. Each title was slotted into one of four categories: Good-Good; Bad-Good; Good-Bad; Bad-Bad. The first qualifier was qualitative, while the second represented a high-low binary, the title’s aspiration toward capital-A Art or lack thereof.

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Power of Attorney·

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In a Walmart parking lot in Portsmouth, Virginia, in 2015, a white police officer named Stephen Rankin shot and killed an unarmed, eighteen-­year-­old black man named William Chapman. “This is my second one,” he told a bystander seconds after firing the fatal shots, seemingly in reference to an incident four years earlier, when he had shot and killed another unarmed man, an immigrant from Kazakhstan. Rankin, a Navy veteran, had been arresting Chapman for shoplifting when, he claimed, Chapman charged him in a manner so threatening that he feared for his life, leaving him no option but to shoot to kill—­the standard and almost invariably successful defense for officers when called to account for shooting civilians. Rankin had faced no charges for his earlier killing, but this time, something unexpected happened: Rankin was indicted on a charge of first-­degree murder by Portsmouth’s newly elected chief prosecutor, thirty-­one-year-­old Stephanie Morales. Furthermore, she announced that she would try the case herself, the first time she had ever prosecuted a homicide. “No one could remember us having an actual prosecution for the killing of an unarmed person by the police,” Morales told me. “I got a lot of feedback, a lot of people saying, ‘You shouldn’t try this case. If you don’t win, it may affect your reelection. Let someone else do it.’ ”

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Carlitos in Charge·

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I was in Midtown, sitting by a dry fountain, making a list of all the men I’d slept with since my last checkup—doctor’s orders. Afterward, I would head downtown and wait for Quimby at the bar, where there were only alcoholics and the graveyard shift this early. I’d just left the United Nations after a Friday morning session—likely my last. The agenda had included resolutions about a worldwide ban on plastic bags, condemnation of a Slobodan Miloševic statue, sanctions on Israel, and a truth and reconciliation commission in El Salvador. Except for the proclamation opposing the war criminal’s marble replica, everything was thwarted by the United States and a small contingent of its allies. None of this should have surprised me. Some version of these outcomes had been repeating weekly since World War II.

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Life after Life·

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For time ylost, this know ye,
By no way may recovered be.
—Chaucer

I spent thirty-eight years in prison and have been a free man for just under two. After killing a man named Thomas Allen Fellowes in a drunken, drugged-up fistfight in 1980, when I was nineteen years old, I was sentenced to life without the possibility of parole. Former California governor Jerry Brown commuted my sentence and I was released in 2017, five days before Christmas. The law in California, like in most states, grants the governor the right to alter sentences. After many years of advocating for the reformation of the prison system into one that encourages rehabilitation, I had my life restored to me.

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HARPER’S FINEST

Happiness Is a Worn Gun

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“Nowadays, most states let just about anybody who wants a concealed-handgun permit have one; in seventeen states, you don’t even have to be a resident. Nobody knows exactly how many Americans carry guns, because not all states release their numbers, and even if they did, not all permit holders carry all the time. But it’s safe to assume that as many as 6 million Americans are walking around with firearms under their clothes.”

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