James Wolcott

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Palpitations — From the November 1983 issue

Philip Larkin’s enormous yes

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A connoisseur of doom whose wit refuses to die

Palpitations — From the October 1983 issue

Hammett’s long goodbye

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A deferential biography of literature’s Marlboro man

Palpitations — From the September 1983 issue

The prince of finesse

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Nine hundred pages of criticism prove that John Updike is no air-dancing dandy

Palpitations — From the August 1983 issue

Mooing in the meadows of love

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Confessional novels that give real life a bad name

Article — From the July 1983 issue

The neat stuff

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Palpitations — From the June 1983 issue

Blowing smoke into the zeitgeist

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The well-deserved resurrection of Jean Stafford

Palpitations — From the May 1983 issue

Enter the mummy

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Norman Mailer finally gets his Egyptian novel out of his system

Palpitations — From the April 1983 issue

Rockwell around the clock

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Awaiting the great synthesis of rock and classical music

Palpitations — From the March 1983 issue

Call me Bwana

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The subject is Africa and William Boyd writes about it like Evelyn Waugh, only nicer

Palpitations — From the February 1983 issue

Troubadour of sweat

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Muscle-bound and Manhattan-bound

Palpitations — From the January 1983 issue

The sensitive Plante

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Telling without kissing

Palpitations — From the December 1982 issue

The limits of poetic license

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The more you learn about Robert Lowell’s life, the less you want to read his poems

Palpitations — From the November 1982 issue

My Harvard, your mama

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Misty memoirs by ivy-covered nostalgiacs who should have known better

Palpitations — From the October 1982 issue

Naughty old men

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Two veteran novelists who can still bounce the bedsprings

Palpitations — From the September 1982 issue

Stop me before I write again

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Six hundred more pages by Joyce Carol Oates

Palpitations — From the August 1982 issue

Where critics go wrong

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The careers of Kenneth Tynan and Otis Ferguson

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I hope that after reading the following pages the leaders of the Y. M. C. A. will start a campaign to induce good young men to do nothing. If so, I shall not have lived in vain.

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