Art, Monday Gallery — May 30, 2016, 8:00 am

Eisenman MG copy

Biergarten at Night, a painting by Nicole Eisenman, whose retrospective Al-ugh-ories is on view through June 26, at the New Museum, in New York City. Courtesy the artist and Bobbi and Stephen Rosenthal, New York City

Context — May 27, 2016, 12:29 pm

Fifty Years Under a Cloud

Barack Obama visits Hiroshima; Tom Engelhardt searches for our atomic history

Postcard — May 26, 2016, 12:49 pm

Upward Immobility

Navigating Colombia’s class-based estrato system

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Conversation — May 25, 2016, 1:13 pm

Unjust Cause

Historian Gar Alperovitz on the decision to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki

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Weekly Review — May 24, 2016, 12:55 pm

Weekly Review

Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto proposed legalizing same-sex marriage, Canadian parliament members introduced legislation that would ban discrimination against transgender people, and teenagers in Chester, Vermont, wore “Straight Pride” T-shirts to protest a new policy at their high school that allows transgender students to use whatever bathroom accords with their gender identity. A Louisiana lawmaker proposed and then withdrew legislation that would have required dancers at strip clubs to weigh less than 161 pounds. “I can’t strip, either,” said the representative. “I’m a little overweight.” Read more…


Art, Monday Gallery — May 23, 2016, 4:40 pm

Dorothea Lange MG

The Road West, U.S. 54 in Southern New Mexico,” a photograph by Dorothea Lange, whose work is on view as part of California and the West: Photography from the Campaign for Art, at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The museum reopened this month after a nearly three-year renovation.

Weekly Review — May 18, 2016, 6:35 pm

Weekly Review

Rodrigo Duterte, the mayor of Davao City, who called the pope a “son of a whore” and has been accused of running vigilante death squads that have killed 1,000 people, was elected president of the Philippines, promising to end crime in six months by “killing five criminals a week” and by restoring the “death penalty by hanging in public.” “If I fail,” he said during his campaign, “kill me.” Read more…

Art, Monday Gallery — May 16, 2016, 3:20 pm

georgiaokeeffe

Red Mesa, a painting by Georgia O’Keeffe, from Georgia O’Keeffe: Watercolors 1916–1918, published this month by Radius Books and the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Editor's Note — May 13, 2016, 1:31 pm

Inside the June Issue

Helen Ouyang on the cost of crowd-sourcing drugs, Paul Wood on Trump’s supporters, Walter Kirn on political predictions, Sonia Faleiro on a man’s search for his kidnapped children, and Rivka Galchen on The People v. O. J. Simpson.

Weekly Review — May 10, 2016, 1:07 pm

Weekly Review

Indian scientists attempted to curb carbon emissions by making cows less flatulent, and the Tunisian champions of the cattle-herding mobile game Bagra were given an adult cow. A 10-year-old Finnish hacker was awarded $10,000 after discovering a bug in Instagram. “I could have deleted anyone’s comments,” he said. “Like Justin Bieber’s.” Justin Bieber was sued for destroying the iPhone of a man who took photos of him failing to complete a beer bong. Read more…

Art, Monday Gallery — May 9, 2016, 2:18 pm

©Brodersen

“String, Cloth, and Kite 05,” a photograph by Ole Brodersen, whose work is currently on view at Scandinavia House, New York City. Courtesy Muriel Guépin Gallery, New York City

Context — May 6, 2016, 3:42 pm

The Albany Handshake

Sheldon Silver is sentenced to twelve years in prison for fraud; Christopher Ketcham visits New York’s dysfunctional state legislature.

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Postcard — May 5, 2016, 11:37 am

A Sense of War

What does the war in Aleppo smell of? It smells of carbine, of wood smoke, of unwashed bodies, of rubbish rotting, of fear.

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Publisher's Note — May 4, 2016, 12:33 pm

The Clinton Cartel

Journalists are doing the Clintons’ dirty work for them and their machine.

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Weekly Review — May 3, 2016, 1:29 pm

Weekly Review

A New Jersey judge reduced to simple assault the charge of aggravated assault filed against a man who while dressed as the Easter Bunny dropped a 15-month-old girl during a photo shoot and then began to fight her mother. A daughter and mother in Georgia were charged with animal abuse for keeping 38 cats in their van, a man in Iowa was charged with animal neglect for keeping 62 ducks in a U-Haul, an elephant in Cambodia that was forced to carry tourists on a 104-degree day had a heart attack and died, a man in Hawaii was filmed punching a pregnant monk seal, and researchers found that dogs experience anxiety when hugged by humans. Read more…


Excerpt — May 2, 2016, 12:25 pm

Point of No Return

Obama’s legacy in the Middle East

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Art, Monday Gallery — May 2, 2016, 11:23 am

Anne Collier Women Crying

“Woman Crying #8″ and “Woman Crying #7,” photographs by Anne Collier, whose artist book Women Crying was published last month by Hassla. Collier’s work is now on view at Anton Kern Gallery, in New York City. © The artist. Courtesy the artist; Hassla, New York City; and Anton Kern Gallery, New York City

Context — April 29, 2016, 11:34 am

Fighting Chance

Samuel James photographs the English Premier League season; Leicester City nears the title

Art, Sketch — April 27, 2016, 1:01 pm

HarpersWeb-Wertz-ThenandNowBronx-hpimage

Illustrations of theaters in the Bronx, as they appeared decades ago and today.

Heart of Empire — April 26, 2016, 5:07 pm

A Policy of Hypocrisy

Trump wants to cut off Mexicans’ money? That’s what the Obama Administration already does to Somalis.

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Helen Ouyang on the cost of crowd-sourcing drugs, Paul Wood on Trump's supporters, Walter Kirn on political predictions, Sonia Faleiro on a man's search for his kidnapped children, and Rivka Galchen on The People v. O. J. Simpson.

The new docudrama The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story (FX) isn’t really about Orenthal James Simpson. It’s about the trials that ran alongside his — those informal, unboundaried, court-of-public-opinion trials in which evidence was heard for and against the murder victims, the defense and the prosecution, the judge, the jury, and the Los Angeles Police Department, to say nothing of white and black America. History has freed us from suspense about Simpson’s verdict, so that the man himself (played here by Cuba Gooding Jr.) is less the tragic hero he seemed in the mid-Nineties than a curiously minor character. He comes to the center of our attention only once, in Episode 2, at the end of the lengthy Ford Bronco chase scene — which in real life was followed by a surreal cavalcade of police cars and media helicopters, as well as an estimated 95 million live viewers — when Simpson repeatedly, and with apparent sincerity, apologizes for taking up so much of so many people’s time. It is an uncannily ordinary moment of social decorum, a sort of could-you-please-pass-the-salt gesture on a sinking Titanic, in which Simpson briefly becomes more than just an archetype.

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"All our friends are saying, load up with plenty of ammunition, because after the stores don’t have no food they’re gonna be hitting houses. They’re going to take over America, put their flag on the Capitol.” “Who?” I asked. “ISIS. Oh yeah.”
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He made them groom and feed the half-dozen horses used to transport the raw bricks to the furnace. Like the horses, the children were beaten with whips.
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The Old Man·

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The new docudrama The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story (FX) isn’t really about Orenthal James Simpson. It’s about the trials that ran alongside his — those informal, unboundaried, court-of-public-opinion trials in which evidence was heard for and against the murder victims, the defense and the prosecution, the judge, the jury, and the Los Angeles Police Department, to say nothing of white and black America. History has freed us from suspense about Simpson’s verdict, so that the man himself (played here by Cuba Gooding Jr.) is less the tragic hero he seemed in the mid-Nineties than a curiously minor character. He comes to the center of our attention only once, in Episode 2, at the end of the lengthy Ford Bronco chase scene — which in real life was followed by a surreal cavalcade of police cars and media helicopters, as well as an estimated 95 million live viewers — when Simpson repeatedly, and with apparent sincerity, apologizes for taking up so much of so many people’s time. It is an uncannily ordinary moment of social decorum, a sort of could-you-please-pass-the-salt gesture on a sinking Titanic, in which Simpson briefly becomes more than just an archetype.

Illustration (detail) by Jen Renninger
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With its lens shifting from the courtroom to the newsroom to people’s back yards, the series evokes the way in which, for a brief, delusory moment, the O. J. verdict seemed to deliver justice for all black men.
Still from The People vs. OJ Simpson: American Crime Story © FX Networks

Amount an auditor estimated last year that Oregon could save each year by feeding prisoners less food:

$62,000

Kentucky is the saddest state.

An Italian economist was questioned on suspicion of terrorism after a fellow passenger on an American Airlines flight witnessed him writing differential equations on a pad of paper.

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