Context — August 26, 2016, 11:43 am

It’s Not How They Say It

From an interview with a girl in a reintegration program for former child soldiers in Colombia.

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Weekly Review — August 25, 2016, 4:38 pm

Weekly Review

A 12-year-old boy was placed in charge of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in Jefferson County, Colorado, by his mother, an official campaign coordinator. “You have a responsibility to your children,” she said, “to teach them.” Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort resigned after it was reported that he received $12.7 million in undisclosed cash payments from former Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych, for whom Manafort consulted, and the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation removed a statue of a naked Trump from Union Square. “NYC Parks stands firmly against any unpermitted erection,” said a spokesperson, “no matter how small.” Read more…

Art, Monday Gallery — August 22, 2016, 3:05 pm

©Evans

“Big Marsh, Calumet Region, Chicago, 2015,” a photograph by Terry Evans, whose work is on view in the exhibition Petcoke: Tracing Dirty Energy, at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, in Chicago. Photograph © The artist

Weekly Review — August 16, 2016, 2:50 pm

Weekly Review

A Filipino congressman called for banning Trump from the Philippines after the candidate referred to the country as a “terrorist nation” and called its denizens “animals,” and a Trump supporter from Virginia traveled to New York City and climbed 16 stories of Trump Tower with suction cups to demand an audience with the candidate, who was campaigning in Virginia at the time. It was reported that Trump’s campaign manager received $12.7 million in “undisclosed cash payments” from a pro-Russian political party in 2012, and Clinton’s tax returns revealed that 96 percent of her charitable donations last year were made to the Clinton Family Foundation. A black coating of biofilm was found growing on monuments across Washington, D.C. Read more…

Art, Monday Gallery — August 15, 2016, 2:10 pm

©Springford

Untitled, 1958–59, a painting by Vivian Springford, whose work is currently on view at the Denver Art Museum in the exhibition Women of Abstract Expressionism. Her work was included in a book of the same name, published in June by Yale University Press. Artwork courtesy McCormick Gallery, Chicago, and Gary Snyder Fine Art, New York City


Editor's Note — August 12, 2016, 11:52 am

Inside the September Issue

Andrew Cockburn on the Saudi slaughter in Yemen, Carolyn Kormann on California homeowners’ battle with nature, Alan Jacobs on the disappearance of Christian intellectuals, a forum on a post-Obama foreign policy, a story by Alice McDermott, and more

Weekly Review — August 10, 2016, 11:44 am

Weekly Review

A grandmother in New Mexico was arrested for allowing her drunk 13-year-old grandson to drive, the start-up company Ambrosia announced plans to start clinical trials in which older adults seeking “rejuvenation” would receive blood transfusions from people between the ages of 16 and 25, and alumni contributions to colleges and universities nationwide dropped because of protests over racial equality on campuses. “I feel that I have been lied to, patronized, and basically dismissed as an old, white bigot,” wrote an Amherst alumnus. Read more…

Art, Monday Gallery — August 8, 2016, 1:27 pm

©Boillot

“71316, David at the Old Post Office, Acme, LA,” a photograph by Rachel Boillot from Post Script, her series documenting the closure of rural post offices in the South, which is currently on view at the Half King Photography Series, in New York City. Photograph © The artist

Conversation — August 5, 2016, 12:08 pm

Lincoln’s Party

Sidney Blumenthal on the origins of the Republican Party, the fallout from Clinton’s emails, and his new biography of Abraham Lincoln

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Publisher's Note — August 4, 2016, 1:29 pm

Trump’s Trade Talk

Above all, NAFTA is an investment agreement, financial and political in nature, and it has always been considered as such by both Republicans and Democrats.

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Weekly Review — August 3, 2016, 6:54 pm

Weekly Review

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump announced that he wouldn’t endorse Republican Speaker of the House Paul Ryan for reelection, kicked a crying baby out of a rally in Virginia, asked Russia to steal U.S. State Department emails, reportedly asked three times during a national-security briefing why the United States shouldn’t use nuclear weapons, and said he wanted to hit a “little guy” so hard “his head would spin.” Researchers in the United Kingdom discovered an orangutan that mimics human conversations. Read more…

Art, Monday Gallery — August 1, 2016, 3:19 pm

Degas MG

Heads of a Man and a Woman (Homme et femme, en buste), circa 1877–80, a monotype on paper by Edgar Degas. Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty, a survey of the artist’s monotypes, closed last month at the Museum of Modern Art, in New York City.

Postcard — July 29, 2016, 1:32 pm

Home Alone

Life after five years in Al Shabaab

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Weekly Review — July 26, 2016, 3:19 pm

Weekly Review

The Republican Party’s new platform said pornography was a “public-health crisis” and marriage was between a man and a woman, the porn-aggregation site PornHub reported that Cleveland-area searches for “Trump” had increased 648 percent, and, according to some male escorts near the convention, the number of married men using their services went up by a factor of six. “I haven’t been getting any calls,” said a female escort. Read more…

Art, Monday Gallery — July 25, 2016, 11:00 am

Titre: Oubliez le passé et vous perdez les deux yeux" », Dimen

Oubliez le passé et vous perdez les deux yeux, a painting by Eddy Kamuanga Ilunga, whose work is on view through July 30 at October Gallery, in London. Courtesy the artist and October Gallery, London


Editor's Note — July 21, 2016, 3:35 pm

Inside the August Issue

Martin Amis on the rise of Trump, Tom Wolfe on the origins of speech, Art Spiegelman on Si Lewen, fiction by Diane Williams, and more

Art, Sketch — July 21, 2016, 11:45 am

HarpersWeb-ThenAndNow-Williamsburg-Wertz-hp

Illustrations of Graham Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, as it appeared between the 1930s and today.

Official Business — July 19, 2016, 12:46 pm

International Festival of the Living Press

See Harper’s Magazine contributors Art Spiegelman and Tomas van Houtryve at the International Festival of the Living Press in Couthures, France. Click here to download the program.

Weekly Review — July 19, 2016, 11:54 am

Weekly Review

A 19-year-old stripper in Connecticut was arrested for arson after police found her boyfriend’s DNA on a potato, which she had allegedly shoved in the tailpipe of a van owned by the man whose business she set on fire; and inmates at a jail in El Dorado, Kansas, rioted in protest of a mashed-potato lunch. A former U.S. intelligence official said pornography constituted 80 percent of the material on jihadists’ seized laptops, and Starbucks and McDonald’s made porn inaccessible from their Wi-Fi networks. Read more…

Art, Monday Gallery — July 18, 2016, 2:57 pm

20130829_RS 008

Photograph by Tomasz Gudzowaty, from his monograph Closer, published last month by Steidl. Courtesy Steidl

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Andrew Cockburn on the Saudi slaughter in Yemen, Alan Jacobs on the disappearance of Christian intellectuals, a forum on a post-Obama foreign policy, a story by Alice McDermott, and more
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Just a few short years ago, Yemen was judged to be among the poorest countries in the world, ranking 154th out of the 187 nations on the U.N.’s Human Development Index. One in every five Yemenis went hungry. Almost one in three was unemployed. Every year, 40,000 children died before their fifth birthday, and experts predicted the country would soon run out of water.

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Just a few short years ago, Yemen was judged to be among the poorest countries in the world, ranking 154th out of the 187 nations on the U.N.’s Human Development Index. One in every five Yemenis went hungry. Almost one in three was unemployed. Every year, 40,000 children died before their fifth birthday, and experts predicted the country would soon run out of water.

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Acceptable Losses·

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Just a few short years ago, Yemen was judged to be among the poorest countries in the world, ranking 154th out of the 187 nations on the U.N.’s Human Development Index. One in every five Yemenis went hungry. Almost one in three was unemployed. Every year, 40,000 children died before their fifth birthday, and experts predicted the country would soon run out of water.

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"To Chomsky...every child’s language organ could use the 'deep structure,' 'universal grammar,' and 'language acquisition device' he was born with to express what he had to say, no matter whether it came out of his mouth in English or Urdu or Nagamese."
Illustration (detail) by Darrel Rees. Source photograph © Miroslav Dakov/Alamy Live News

Chances that college students select as “most desirable‚” the same face chosen by the chickens:

49 in 50

Most of the United States’ 36,000 yearly bunk-bed injuries involve male victims.

In Italy, a legislator called for parents who feed their children vegan diets to be sentenced to up to six years in prison, and in Sweden, a woman attempted to vindicate her theft of six pairs of underwear by claiming she had severe diarrhea.

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