No Comment — June 21, 2007, 11:49 am

Palace Fit for a Viceroy

Heavy security, large-scale architecture, and riverfront real estate–these hallmarks of diplomatic compounds are evident in such locations as the UN Headquarters in New York. But imagine that the UN took up six times its current space, ballooning to 104 acres. Instead of the roughly six city blocks adjacent to the East River the UN currently sits on, it would stretch a third of the way across Manhattan, from 1st Avenue to 5th Avenue, taking up every block in that span between 42nd and 48th Streets.

Someone would cry foul. If not real estate developers, then certainly citizens who felt the UN’s overwhelming presence unnecessary might be upset. Thankfully for New Yorkers, a compound of this grand scale is being built not in Manhattan but far away–actually, right in the heart of downtown Baghdad.

Enter the Green Zone, home to the nearly-complete new US embassy for Iraq. Readers might recall that three weeks ago the architects of the new embassy, of the firm Berger Devine Yaeger, mistakenly posted secret plans for the compound on their website. The Huffington Post ran the story, as did many other media outlets.

The massive new US embassy will sit within the bounds of the Green Zone, directly adjacent to the Tigris River. Those who saw the leaked memo from Ambassador Crocker to Condoleeza Rice, which emphasized inadequate staffing problems in addition to limited Arabic capabilities among the resident DoS staff, will be relieved to know that the new embassy will have plenty of space for more staff. It will contain 20 structures, housing for 380 families (this author wonders: who’s really going to take their family to Baghdad these days?), luxury facilities like a nightclub and a swimming pool, and 15 foot thick outer walls, all at a cost of $592 million. A veritable “fortress of democracy,” you might say.

Domestic political sentiments about the US military presence in Iraq have waxed and waned, and it appears now that an eventual withdrawal of most US troops is inevitable. However, the massive physical and financial investment that the new embassy represents indicates that America is not leaving Iraq for good anytime soon.

Consider State Department spokesman Justin Higgins’s view on the matter:

As far as the size goes … both the President and the Secretary of State have said that we are committed to rebuilding Iraq and to restoring the economy and to stabilizing the security. The size of the embassy is in keeping with the goals of we have set for Iraq.” Perhaps the location of the embassy – the Green Zone is inaccessible to ordinary Iraqis – says something about exactly what those goals are.

So “size matters,” in the perspective of the State Department. There are legitimate needs for security at any U.S. facility in Iraq; moreover, it’s desirable for America to maintain some kind of diplomatic presence in Baghdad long after U.S. troops leave. Yet a massive fortified compound within an even bigger restricted American area smacks of an imperial presence. 104 acres says a whole lot more than plain old diplomatic presence, and a whole lot less than respect for Iraq’s sovereignty. An 8,000 man mission implies constant, far-reaching, direct involvement in Iraq’s domestic affairs for years to come. The U.S. will want to help Iraqis continue to build their nation. Perhaps, though, there are subtler ways to retain that capability than forcing Iraqi officials to come begging to a monstrous, palm tree-lined palace fit for a Caesar on the banks of the Tiber–I mean, Tigris.

Evan Magruder contributed to this post.

Share
Single Page

More from Scott Horton:

Conversation August 5, 2016, 12:08 pm

Lincoln’s Party

Sidney Blumenthal on the origins of the Republican Party, the fallout from Clinton’s emails, and his new biography of Abraham Lincoln

Conversation March 30, 2016, 3:44 pm

Burn Pits

Joseph Hickman discusses his new book, The Burn Pits, which tells the story of thousands of U.S. soldiers who, after returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, have developed rare cancers and respiratory diseases.

Context, No Comment August 28, 2015, 12:16 pm

Beltway Secrecy

In five easy lessons

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

December 2016

Separated at Birth

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Priest in the Trees

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Lightness

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

With Child

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Standing Rock Speaks

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Prose by Any Other Name

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
With Child·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. 'Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.'"
Photograph (detail) by Lara Shipley
Article
Swat Team·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"As we shall see, for the sort of people who write and edit the opinion pages of the Post, there was something deeply threatening about Sanders and his political views."
Illustration (detail) by John Ritter
Article
Escape from The Caliphate·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"When Matti invited me on a tour of the neighborhood, I asked about security. 'The message has already been passed to ISIS that you’re here,' he said. 'But don’t worry. I guarantee I could bring even you in and out of the Islamic State.'"
Photograph (detail) by Alice Martins
Article
In This One·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"She glanced across the waiting room at a television playing a birth-control ad and laughed darkly. 'Jesus, Lord, it would be so nice if someone just pushed me down a flight of stairs.'"
Illustration (detail) by Shonagh Rae
Article
“Don’t Touch My Medicare!”·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"Medicare’s popularity, however, comes with almost no understanding of what the program is and how it works."
Illustration (detail) by Nate Kitch

Damages sought, in a defamation suit, by a Chicago landlord from a tenant who complained about mold via Twitter:

$50,000

The British House of Lords voted to limit the right of parents to spank their children.

The Mall of America hired its first black Santa, a real estate company valued Mr. and Mrs. Claus’s North Pole home at $656,957, and it was reported that the price of the gifts from “Twelve Days of Christmas” went up by more than $200 in 2016, to $34,363.49.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Who Goes Nazi?

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

By

"It is an interesting and somewhat macabre parlor game to play at a large gathering of one’s acquaintances: to speculate who in a showdown would go Nazi. By now, I think I know. I have gone through the experience many times—in Germany, in Austria, and in France. I have come to know the types: the born Nazis, the Nazis whom democracy itself has created, the certain-to-be fellow-travelers. And I also know those who never, under any conceivable circumstances, would become Nazis."

Subscribe Today