Washington Babylon — August 22, 2008, 8:46 am

Olympics Chief OK on China jailing grannies, but really annoyed by Jamaican sprinter’s celebration

During the run-up to the Olympics and beyond, Jacques Rogge, the president of the International Olympic Committee, uttered barely a word of criticism about the Chinese government. China breaks its promise to allow unfettered access to foreign journalists; that’s OK for Rogge. Beijing refuses to allow demonstrators, even within official “protest zones; that’s A-OK by Jacques. China sentences two old ladies to “re-education through labor;” yawn.

But now Rogge has been pushed past his limits — by Usain Bolt, the Jamaican gold medal winner of the 100 and 200 meter sprints. It seems Rogge is annoyed at Bolt “for not showing enough respect to his rivals after breaking world records in both events,” the Telegraph reports . “Bolt burst through the finish line with his arms outstretched and then carried on running into his lap of honour.”

“I understand the joy,” Rogge was quoted as saying. “He might have interpreted it in another way but the way it was perceived was ‘catch me if you can’. You don’t do that. But he’ll learn. He’s still a young man.”

The Telegraph said of Rogge’s remarks:

It is unusual for the IOC president to be so mean-spirited. Bolt has been the face of these Games and his elation at winning both sprint titles has been a major part of his appeal. For all the reservations in the wake of the many doping scandals around the sport, Bolt has changed the face of sprinting.

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