Washington Babylon — September 16, 2008, 12:33 pm

Congress Still Taking Money From UBS Despite Multiple Investigations

Speaking of huge contributions to politicians from Wall Street, you’d think members of Congress would by now be reluctant to accept donations from the American subsidiary of Swiss giant UBS. The economy looks to be in free-fall and the financial excesses (and dubious accounting) of firms like UBS is one important reason why.

UBS has been implicated in the sub-prime mortgage crisis, having been forced to write down “more than $18 billion in exposure to subprime loans and other risky securities.” Even worse, a Senate committee in July “completed its report on UBS’s role in helping wealthy investors shield money from federal taxes,” the Washington Post recently reported. “The bank also is under scrutiny by the IRS and the Justice Department.”

Yet new campaign disclosure reports show that prominent members of Congress, including members of the Senate Banking Committee and House Financial Services Committee, continue to take in big money from UBS. During the second half of August, the company cut checks for a combined $68,500, money that overwhelmingly went to Republicans. Top recipients (accepting the maximum PAC contribution of $5,000) included Senators Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, and Congressmen Adam Putnam of Florida, Lamar Smith of Texas, and Pat Tiberi of Ohio. Senator Mel Martinez and House Republican Leader John Boehner each got a check for $2,500 from UBS.

Some Democrats were also more than happy to take UBS’s cash. Getting the $5,000 maximum from the company were Senator Robert Menendez of New Jersey (through his personal PAC) and Congressman Rick Boucher of Virginia.

UBS, of course, has connections to Senator John McCain’s campaign through former Senator Phil Gramm, one of the senator’s economic gurus. The McCain campaign ditched Gramm–who has served as a lobbyist for UBS and as vice chairman of its investment banking arm–after he detailed his economic recovery plan, namely that things would get better when Americans stopped whining.

Share
Single Page

More from Ken Silverstein:

Commentary November 17, 2015, 6:41 pm

Shaky Foundations

The Clintons’ so-called charitable enterprise has served as a vehicle to launder money and to enrich family friends.

From the November 2013 issue

Dirty South

The foul legacy of Louisiana oil

Perspective October 23, 2013, 8:00 am

On Brining and Dining

How pro-oil Louisiana politicians have shaped American environmental policy

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

October 2016

Psychedelic Trap

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Hamilton Cult

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Held Back

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Division Street

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Innocents

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Quiet Car

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
The Hamilton Cult·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"The past is complicated, and explaining it is not just a trick, but a gamble."
Illustration by Jimmy Turrell
Article
Division Street·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"Perfectly sane people lose access to housing every day, though the resultant ordeal may undermine some of that sanity, as it might yours and mine."
Photograph © Robert Gumpert
Article
Held Back·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"'We don’t know where the money went!' a woman cried out. 'They looted it! They stole our money!'"
Artwork by Mischelle Moy
Article
The Quiet Car·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Flor Arely Sánchez had been in bed with a fever and pains throughout her body for three days when a July thunderstorm broke over the mountainside. She got nervous when bolts of light flashed in the sky. Lightning strikes the San Julián region of western El Salvador several times a year, and her neighbors fear storms more than they fear the march of diseases — first dengue, then chikungunya, now Zika. Flor worried about a lot of things, since she was pregnant.

Late in the afternoon, when the pains had somewhat eased, Flor thought she might go to a dammed-up bit of the river near her house to bathe. She is thirty-five and has lived in the same place all her life, where wrinkled hills are planted with corn, beans, and fruit trees. She took a towel and soap and walked out into the rain. Halfway to the river, the pains returned and overcame her. The next thing Flor remembers, she was in a room she didn’t recognize, unable to move. As she soon discovered, she was in a hospital, her ankle cuffed to the bed, and she was being investigated for abortion.

Photograph by Joshua Lutz
Article
Innocents·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"The next thing Flor remembers, she was in a room she didn’t recognize, unable to move. As she soon discovered, she was in a hospital, her ankle cuffed to the bed, and she was being investigated for abortion."
Photograph © Nadia Shira Cohen

Average amount the company paid each of its 140 top executives last year:

$5,300,000

Between one fifth and one half of England’s leisure horses are obese.

Scientists in the Galápagos Islands credited an endangered giant tortoise named Diego with saving his species by fathering more than 800 offspring.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Mississippi Drift

By

Matt was happy enough to sustain himself on the detritus of a world he saw as careening toward self-destruction, and equally happy to scam a government he despised. 'I’m glad everyone’s so wasteful,' he told me. 'It supports my lifestyle.'

Subscribe Today