Washington Babylon — January 5, 2009, 9:28 am

Will Hayden Stay at CIA?

Barack Obama still hasn’t gotten around to naming his CIA director, and there’s still talk that he might retain Michael Hayden. A former senior CIA official I spoke with thinks that would be a very bad idea. Here’s what he had to say:

From Obama’s optic, leaving Hayden there for now makes sense. He hasn’t totally fucked up and he can always get rid of him later. He’s a safe place holder. But it won’t play well in the building. He hasn’t earned respect. He’s a four-star airforce general who’s not a pilot or a war guy. He is a really nice guy, he just has no business running the nations espionage business. He’s a professional administrator and they need a good case officer. They need a spy to rebuild, restructure, motivate and run the nations spy service. Bush is leaving office, after two terms with the same intelligence questions unanswered that he faced when he arrived? How is this possible? The core intelligence questions on Iran, Iraq, North Korea, China, bin Laden’s location, al Qaida’s operational abilities remain intact, after billions of dollars spent, and the largest personnel increase in agency history. When asked why, you get answers like “its hard”, “its a monumental challenge”, “we doing good work”, etc. All of that means nothing. They are failing to accomplish their core mission on a number of fronts.

The agency was designed in 1947 as a civilian service, but if he keeps Hayden, you’ll have military people in all the key positions in the new national security structure: Hayden as DCI, a general as National Security Advisor and an admiral as Director of National Intelligence, and there are military officers sprinkled all over the agency. There a lot of people upset about this.he military dabbles in the intelligence business, yet has the largest bite of the budget. Their intelligence requirements tend to be tactical collection, with offensive operations designed to act on tactical collection in war zones. They know little or nothing about living and operating under cover, alias operational activities, the full recruitment cycle, covert communications and handling spies in denied areas, clandestine operations, surveillance detection…..the core operational disciplines.

The military is linear, conventional, with a fixed chain of command, strict operational authority and execution processes, and heavy on the ground; the agency system is anathema to the military system. When I say agency, I mean the old DO, the clandestine service (case officers). You need officers who are disciplined and creative, operating in an undisciplined system and operational environment. Someone who is comfortable making their own decisions, alone, because they can’t “call home” for authority or permission. The military is the exact opposite. Rigid chain of command, authority flows from the top down, and if the people on the operational end of the spear do not have specific permission to move or act, they will sit until they do. The military is staffed with heavily disciplined people (rigid), operating in an even more disciplined and structured system. With the agency it’s strength is speed, flexibility, and nimbleness in the field. Because of the nature of intelligence, opportunity surfaces and disappears quickly. You need the latitude to operate; the military’s first response is to stop and ask permission.

Share
Single Page

More from Ken Silverstein:

Commentary November 17, 2015, 6:41 pm

Shaky Foundations

The Clintons’ so-called charitable enterprise has served as a vehicle to launder money and to enrich family friends.

From the November 2013 issue

Dirty South

The foul legacy of Louisiana oil

Perspective October 23, 2013, 8:00 am

On Brining and Dining

How pro-oil Louisiana politicians have shaped American environmental policy

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

July 2016

The Ideology of Isolation

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

American Idle

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

My Holy Land Vacation

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The City That Bleeds

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

El Bloqueo

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Vladivostok Station

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
My Holy Land Vacation·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"I wanted to more fully understand why conservative politics had become synonymous with no-questions-asked support of Israel."
Illustration (detail) by Matthew Richardson
Post
Inside the July Issue·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Tom Bissell on touring Israel with Christian Zionists, Joy Gordon on the Cuban embargo, Lawrence Jackson on Freddie Gray and the makings of an American uprising, a story by Paul Yoon, and more

Freddie Gray’s relatives arrived for the trial in the afternoon, after the prep-school kids had left. By their dress, they seemed to have just gotten off work in the medical and clerical fields. The family did not appear at ease in the courtroom. They winced and dropped their heads as William Porter and his fellow officer Zachary Novak testified to opening the doors of their police van last April and finding Freddie paralyzed, unresponsive, with mucus pooling at his mouth and nose. Four women and one man mournfully listened as the officers described needing to get gloves before they could touch him.

The first of six Baltimore police officers to be brought before the court for their treatment of Freddie Gray, a black twenty-five-year-old whose death in their custody was the immediate cause of the city’s uprising last spring, William Porter is young, black, and on trial. Here in this courtroom, in this city, in this nation, race and the future seem so intertwined as to be the same thing.

Artwork: Camels, Jerusalem (detail) copyright Martin Parr/Magnum Photos
Post
Europe’s Hamilton Moment·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"We all know in France that as soon as a politician starts saying that some problem will be solved at the European level, that means no one is going to do anything."
Photograph (detail) by Stefan Boness
[Report]
How to Make Your Own AR-15·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Even if federal gun-control advocates got everything they wanted, they couldn’t prevent America’s most popular rifle from being made, sold, and used. Understanding why this is true requires an examination of how the firearm is made.
Illustration by Jeremy Traum
Article
The City That Bleeds·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

"Here in this courtroom, in this city, in this nation, race and the future seem so intertwined as to be the same thing."
Photograph (detail) © Wil Sands/Fractures Collective

Number of Turkish college students detained in the last year for requesting Kurdish-language classes:

1,146

Turkey was funding a search for Suleiman the Magnificent’s heart.

A former prison in Philadelphia that has served as a horror-movie set was being prepared as a detention center for protesters arrested at the upcoming Democratic National Convention, and presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump fired his campaign manager.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Mississippi Drift

By

Matt was happy enough to sustain himself on the detritus of a world he saw as careening toward self-destruction, and equally happy to scam a government he despised. 'I’m glad everyone’s so wasteful,' he told me. 'It supports my lifestyle.'

Subscribe Today