Links — April 29, 2009, 8:54 am

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For several years, rights activists have recognised that closing Guantánamo is only half the battle. The next question is: where will the 241 remaining detainees go? One option is to send them home. However, more than 40% of the detainees are Yemeni, and negotiations between the US and Yemen to repatriate those prisoners have reached a ‘complete impasse.’ Yemen is combating an extremist insurgency already, and it is not keen to accept dozens more men who have been described as ‘jihadist foot soldiers.’ Moreover, approximately 60 detainees from various nations have said that they fear torture or abuse if sent home. In short, repatriation is no panacea.”

Shin Lim Kim alleges the leader of a church service on Aug. 11, 2008 asked her to catch another congregant ‘who was going to be “blessed” or who would be “slain in the spirit.”’ The leader then laid hands on Hyun Joo Yoon, who ‘fell backwards and began flailing, falling on and injuring plaintiff.’ The church was negligent, the complaint says, in not providing multiple catchers; failing to discuss ‘safe catching strategy’ with congregants; selecting Kim– ‘a small and not particularly strong person’– as a catcher; and failing to instruct congregants on ‘the correct procedures to fall, so that they would not injure themselves and injure the person assisting and/or catching them.’”

Most centenarians attribute their great age to some magic elixir or other. The longevity of Dr Levi-Montalcini, the Italian scientist who last week became the first Nobel Prize-winner to reach the age of 100, might be the result of a potion that is a little out of the ordinary: Professor Levi-Montalcini puts her mental vigour down to regular doses of nerve growth factor (NGF)– the discovery that made her famous.” (via)

When she received the invitation to attend her 10-year [high school] reunion… she hired Amy Bernadette “Cricket” Russell, whom she met at a Los Angeles strip club, to impersonate her. Cricket showed up in a slinky dress, fishnet hose and spike heels. As the drinks flowed, Cricket’s clothes came off, and Wachner watched from a hotel room above the event, linked to her impersonator via wireless radio, TV cameras and a monitor. Wachner coached Cricket through the night, telling her the names of people she met and providing her with little secrets that only Wachner and her former classmates would know. (via)

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Andrew Cockburn on the Saudi slaughter in Yemen, Alan Jacobs on the disappearance of Christian intellectuals, a forum on a post-Obama foreign policy, a story by Alice McDermott, and more
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Just a few short years ago, Yemen was judged to be among the poorest countries in the world, ranking 154th out of the 187 nations on the U.N.’s Human Development Index. One in every five Yemenis went hungry. Almost one in three was unemployed. Every year, 40,000 children died before their fifth birthday, and experts predicted the country would soon run out of water.

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Just a few short years ago, Yemen was judged to be among the poorest countries in the world, ranking 154th out of the 187 nations on the U.N.’s Human Development Index. One in every five Yemenis went hungry. Almost one in three was unemployed. Every year, 40,000 children died before their fifth birthday, and experts predicted the country would soon run out of water.

Illustration by John Ritter
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Acceptable Losses·

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Just a few short years ago, Yemen was judged to be among the poorest countries in the world, ranking 154th out of the 187 nations on the U.N.’s Human Development Index. One in every five Yemenis went hungry. Almost one in three was unemployed. Every year, 40,000 children died before their fifth birthday, and experts predicted the country would soon run out of water.

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The Origins of Speech·

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"To Chomsky...every child’s language organ could use the 'deep structure,' 'universal grammar,' and 'language acquisition device' he was born with to express what he had to say, no matter whether it came out of his mouth in English or Urdu or Nagamese."
Illustration (detail) by Darrel Rees. Source photograph © Miroslav Dakov/Alamy Live News

Chances that college students select as “most desirable‚” the same face chosen by the chickens:

49 in 50

Most of the United States’ 36,000 yearly bunk-bed injuries involve male victims.

In Italy, a legislator called for parents who feed their children vegan diets to be sentenced to up to six years in prison, and in Sweden, a woman attempted to vindicate her theft of six pairs of underwear by claiming she had severe diarrhea.

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