No Comment — August 26, 2009, 1:58 pm

D.C. Court Comes Through for Kyle Sampson

D. Kyle Sampson, sometimes referred to as Karl Rove’s “Mini-Me,” was Alberto Gonzales’s chief of staff when the U.S. attorneys scandal broke. He found himself at its epicenter and resigned from the Justice Department. Now his name figures prominently in a special prosecutor’s examination of the scandal.

How does all this affect Sampson’s future as a lawyer in Washington? At first it was a major problem: The D.C. Bar saw a “cloud” over his “moral character,” particularly as it evaluates an internal Justice Department probe, which concluded that Sampson misled Congress and the White House, and as it awaits special prosecutor Nora Dannehy’s decision as to whether charges will be brought. It declined to allow Sampson, who is licensed to practice in Utah, a waiver to practice in the District of Columbia. Since Sampson has become a partner in the Washington office of Hunton & Williams, that would, you expect, put a severe cramp in his style.

However, a phalanx of conservative lawyers and others came to Sampson’s assistance, supporting his petition to the D.C. Court of Appeals to overturn the Bar Admissions Committee’s decision. Portraying Sampson as an unlikely hero in the U.S. attorneys scandal, they scored a resounding success. The National Law Journal reports:

The District of Columbia Court of Appeals quietly granted a rare waiver this spring to allow D. Kyle Sampson to continue practicing law, despite an ongoing criminal investigation into politicized hiring and firing decisions at the U.S. Department of Justice while Sampson was chief of staff to the attorney general. Sampson, who left the department in March 2007, was a key figure in scandals that spurred numerous congressional, internal and criminal probes and that ultimately led to the resignation of several top officials, including his boss, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales. Sampson, who has a Utah law license, joined Hunton & Williams as a partner in the firm’s Washington office in October 2007 and applied for membership to the D.C. Bar.

But after the Justice Department’s internal watchdogs concluded that Sampson violated federal law and misled Congress and the White House, the D.C. Committee on Admissions refused to approve his bar application, according to court filings.

The Court offered no written justification for its opinion. But it’s a fair inference that the judges, who are appointed through a process that centers on the Justice Department, feel that making misleading statements to Congress and playing a key role in the politicization of the Justice Department is all just blood sport for Washington lawyers—nothing to get too worked up about. Their decision will certainly contribute to the D.C. bar’s quite distinct sense of professional ethics.

Share
Single Page

More from Scott Horton:

Context, No Comment August 28, 2015, 12:16 pm

Beltway Secrecy

In five easy lessons

From the April 2015 issue

Company Men

Torture, treachery, and the CIA

Six Questions October 18, 2014, 8:00 pm

The APA Grapples with Its Torture Demons: Six Questions for Nathaniel Raymond

Nathaniel Raymond on CIA interrogation techniques.

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

February 2016

Disunified Front

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

We Don’t Have Rights, But We Are Alive

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Isn’t It Romantic?

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Trusted Traveler

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Trouble with Iowa

The Queen and I

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Isn’t It Romantic?·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“He had paid for much of her schooling, something he cannot help but mention, since the aftermath of any failed relationship brings an ungenerous and impossible impulse to claw back one’s misspent resources.”
Illustration by Shonagh Rae
Article
The Trouble with Iowa·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“It seems to defy reason that this anachronistic farm state — a demographic outlier, with no major cities and just 3 million people, nine out of ten of them white — should play such an outsized role in American politics.”
Photograph (detail) © Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Article
Rule, Britannica·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“This is the strange magic of an arrangement of all the world’s knowledge in alphabetical order: any search for anything passes through things that have nothing in common with it but an initial letter.”
Artwork by Brian Dettmer. Courtesy the artist and P.P.O.W., New York City.
Article
The Queen and I·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“Buckingham Palace is a theater in need of renovation. There is something pathetic about a fiercely vacuumed throne room. The plants are tired. Plastic is nailed to walls and mirrors. The ballroom is set for a ghostly banquet. Everyone is whispering, for we are in a mad kind of church. A child weeps.”
Photograph (detail) © Martin Parr/Magnum Photos
Article
We Don’t Have Rights, But We Are Alive·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

“If I really wanted to learn about the Islamic State, Hassan told me, I ought to speak to his friend Samir, a young gay soldier in the Syrian Army who’d been fighting jihadis intermittently for the past four years.”
Photograph (detail) by Anwar Amro/AFP/Getty

Estimated number of American senior citizens who played tackle football last year:

47,000

An island of fairy penguins was successfully defended against foxes and feral dogs by Maremma sheepdogs.

In Turlock, California, nearly 3,500 samples of bull semen were stolen from the back of a truck.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Two Christmas Mornings of the Great War

By

Civilization masks us with a screen, from ourselves and from one another, with thin depth of unreality. We habitually live — do we not? — in a world self-created, half established, of false values arbitrarily upheld, largely inspired by misconception, misapprehension, wrong perspective, and defective proportion, misapplication.

Subscribe Today