Official Business — September 14, 2011, 9:06 am

Harper’s Magazine Presents: The 9/11 Effect

On Wednesday, September 14, please join us in New York for Harper’s Magazine Presents: The 9/11 Effect.

Amy Goodman of Democracy Now! will be exploring the 9/11 Effect with lawyer and contributing editor Scott Horton, winner of a National Magazine Award for his Harper’s exposé of inmate abuse at Guantánamo Bay; Fordham Law School’s Karen Greenberg, former director of NYU’s Center on Law and Security and author of The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo’s First 100 Days; Petra Bartosiewicz, Harper’s contributor, most recently of “To Catch a Terrorist” in the August 2011 issue; and Michael German, ACLU Policy Counsel and former FBI Special Agent. The event will be introduced by John R. MacArthur, publisher of Harper’s Magazine.

What began as an emergency law-enforcement response to a traumatic domestic attack has been institutionalized in what amounts to a state of permanent emergency. In the decade since the attacks of September 11, 2001, federal agencies have built a vast homeland-security infrastructure in which enhanced domestic intelligence and surveillance programs have become the norm. To better understand not only how these changes came to pass but how they have altered our legal and civic institutions, Harper’s has brought together a panel of leading journalists, lawyers, and policy experts to discuss and debate the legacy of the U.S. war on terrorism.

Date: Wednesday, September 14th, 2011
Time: 7:00–8:30 p.m.
Location: Center for Place, Culture and Politics, City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, Proshansky Auditorium (located on the lower level of the Graduate Center), New York, NY 10016 [map]
Tickets: Free and open to the public. Seating is first-come first-served.

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