Weekly Review — May 24, 2016, 12:55 pm

Weekly Review

A kidnapped Nigerian schoolgirl is found, an EgyptAir flight vanishes, and U.S. doctors perform the first successful penis transplant.

WeeklyAvatar-SM.pngAn EgyptAir flight en route from Paris to Cairo vanished from radar for unknown reasons and then plunged into the Mediterranean Sea.[1] Search parties from Egypt and the United States recovered baggage and human remains from the wreckage but were unable to locate either of the plane’s black boxes.[2] All 66 passengers and crew members were presumed dead, including six from the Nile settlement of Mit Badr Halawa. “Grief is camped over this village,” said a local resident.[3][4] In Syria, at least 78 people died in coordinated suicide attacks by the Islamic State on two government-
held cities; and in Yemen, at least 40 army recruits died when an Islamic State militant detonated a car bomb outside the home of a senior general.[5][6] An American drone strike in the Pakistani province of Baluchistan killed Taliban leader Akhtar Mohammad Mansour, and an antigovernment demonstration in Baghdad’s Green Zone resulted in the deaths of four people.[7][8] In France, police staged a rally in the Place de la République to denounce cop hatred, and a mob set a police car on fire. “Justice,” they chanted, “nowhere.”[9] Authorities in Hong Kong prepared for the visit of a top Chinese politician by reinforcing sidewalks with glue to prevent bricks from being used as weapons, and the Chinese military carried out helicopter-assault exercises near Taiwan days before the inauguration of the island’s first female president. “Relevant persons,” said China’s defense ministry, “shouldn’t read too much into it.”[10][11]

Officials in China denied selling cans of marinated human flesh to African supermarkets, and a schoolgirl kidnapped from the Nigerian town of Chibok two years ago by the Islamist militant group Boko Haram was found wandering in a forest with a four-month-old baby and a man claiming to be her husband.[12][13] Earthquakes of magnitudes 6.7 and 6.8 struck western Ecuador, floods and landslides killed at least 92 people in Sri Lanka, and temperatures rose to a record 123.8 degrees Fahrenheit in India’s desert state of Rajasthan. “My buffalo is giving only one third of the normal milk,” said a farmer.[14][15][16] The U.S. Supreme Court ordered a new trial for a black man sentenced to death by an all-white jury, and an Austrian presidential candidate with the Freedom Party, which was founded by former Nazis, narrowly lost the election.[17][18] Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto proposed legalizing same-sex marriage, Canadian parliament members introduced legislation that would ban discrimination against transgender people, and teenagers in Chester, Vermont, wore “Straight Pride” T-shirts to protest a new policy at their high school that allows transgender students to use whatever bathroom accords with their gender identity.[19][20][21] A Louisiana lawmaker proposed and then withdrew legislation that would have required dancers at strip clubs to weigh less than 161 pounds. “I can’t strip, either,” said the representative. “I’m a little overweight.”[22]

The regional government of Castile and León, Spain, introduced a law to ban the killing of bulls at a centuries-old festival, and it was reported that the owner of central Arizona’s Raging Cajun Smoking Barbecue food truck demanded a sacrifice from his six-year-old son and then snapped the neck of the family poodle and set its corpse on fire.[23][24] Two lions were shot at a Chilean zoo after a man jumped into their cage to commit suicide.[25] At the Preakness Stakes in Baltimore, a gelding named Homeboykris won the opening race and then died of an apparent heart attack, and a four-year-old filly named Pramedya fractured her cannon bone and was euthanized on the track.[26] An 86-year-old Florida man who said he could no longer afford his wife’s medication shot her in the head while she slept.[27] Firefighters in Iowa rescued a naked man who got stuck in a chimney while playing hide-and-go-seek, a teacher at a high school in Texas was found to have played jump rope with students using the intestines of a cat, and a 13-year-old girl in Alabama died for unknown reasons during a game of tug-of-war.[28][29][30] Scientists from Austria, Finland, and Hungary found that trees may sleep at night, and, in Massachusetts, a cancer patient received the first-ever penis transplant in the United States. “We belong together,” he said.[31][32][33]

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Rodrigo Duterte, the president of the Philippines, announced that he has ordered the country’s navy and coast guard to bomb the ships of kidnappers even if civilian hostages are on board.

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