Weekly Review — April 19, 2017, 5:28 am

Weekly Review

The United States drops the Mother of All Bombs in Afghanistan, an Arkansas judge temporarily halts eight executions, and a new study finds that people choose fair inequality over unfair equality.

HarpersMagazine-1853-12-bootsThe U.S. military dropped a 30-foot-long, 21,600-pound munition nicknamed the Mother of All Bombs on a network of Islamic State–held caves and tunnels in Afghanistan, killing 94 people; a convoy of buses carrying Syrians evacuating their homes was bombed by an unknown attacker, killing at least 126 people, including 68 children; and in Cleveland, Ohio, a gunman lethally shot an elderly man, streaming the attack on Facebook Live with the caption “Easter day slaughter.”[1][2][3] Pope Francis prayed that Jesus would help world leaders “prevent the spread of conflicts,” and North Korea launched a test missile that blew up almost immediately, vowing later to begin performing such exercises once a week.[4][5][6] Carter Page, a Trump campaign adviser whose communications with Russia were monitored by the FBI last summer, said that “something may have come up in a conversation” about easing sanctions on Russia during one of his visits there.[7] A Chicago Aviation Department police officer pulled a United Airlines passenger from his seat and forcibly removed him from the plane to make room for an off-duty airline employee; three bodies were tossed from a low-flying plane in the Sinaloa state of Mexico; and Tesla, which has yet to turn a profit, became the most valuable car company in America.[8][9][10]

In Arkansas, a judge temporarily halted plans to execute eight men in the span of 11 days after finding that one of the sedatives in the state’s three-drug lethal-injection protocol, midazolam, could fail to take effect, causing the men to experience what Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor once called “the chemical equivalent of being burned at the stake.”[11][12] Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan said he would “immediately” discuss bringing back the death penalty to his country.[13][14] In Alabama, Governor Robert J. Bentley resigned and pleaded guilty to charges of misusing campaign contributions to hide a prolonged affair with his senior political adviser, and the state’s new governor, Kay Ivey, signed legislation preventing judges from overruling a jury’s guilty verdict in capital murder cases.[15][16] In Texas, a judge again ruled a voter ID law purposefully suppressed minority votes and Wells Fargo ordered two executives to pay back $75 million for creating a culture that led to the massive creation of bogus bank accounts.[17][18] People, a new study reported, choose fair inequality over unfair equality.[19]

The Trump Administration promoted as its new drug czar Representative Tom Marino, who once called for putting nonviolent drug offenders in a “hospital-slash-prison” setting, and White House press secretary Sean Spicer said that Hitler, unlike Syrian president Bashar al-Assad, never used chemical weapons on his own people, then issued at least four apologies.[20][21] Police found chimpanzees, a baboon, and ostriches among the 33 animals held in private zoos by a colonel in Guinea.[22] In Sri Lanka, a 300-foot-tall garbage dump collapsed, killing at least 28 people and displacing about 600 others.[23][24][25] Researchers announced that Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has reached a “terminal stage” after bleaching caused by climate change, and that one of Saturn’s moons could support aquatic life.[26][27]

Sign up and get the Weekly Review delivered to your inbox. Help support our ongoing coverage of Donald Trump by subscribing to Harper’s Magazine today!

Share
Single Page

More from Jacob Rosenberg:

Weekly Review March 7, 2017, 6:20 pm

Weekly Review

Donald Trump accuses Barack Obama of wiretapping Trump Tower, Chicago records its first January and February without snow in 146 years, and veterinarians in Bangkok remove 915 coins from the stomach of a turtle named Piggy Bank.

Get access to 165 years of
Harper’s for only $45.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

May 2017

A Dream Preferred

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Snowden’s Box

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

American Duce

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

A Prayer’s Chance

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Bee-Brained

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Mothers

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
Snowden’s Box·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Mrs. B’s Baby Village Day Care was on a frontage road between a mattress wholesaler and a knife outlet. There were six or so babies as regulars and another one or two on weekends when their parents were passing through looking for work. They wouldn’t find work, of course, all the security positions were full, the timber and ore had all been taken under the active-stewardship program, and the closest new start-up industry was the geothermal field hundreds of miles away. Mrs. B didn’t even bother to write those babies’ names down in her book. It was fifteen dollars a day and they had to be in reasonable health. Even so the occasional mischievous illness would arise and empty the place out.

Illustration (detail) by Taylor Callery
Post
The Forty-Fifth President·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Mrs. B’s Baby Village Day Care was on a frontage road between a mattress wholesaler and a knife outlet. There were six or so babies as regulars and another one or two on weekends when their parents were passing through looking for work. They wouldn’t find work, of course, all the security positions were full, the timber and ore had all been taken under the active-stewardship program, and the closest new start-up industry was the geothermal field hundreds of miles away. Mrs. B didn’t even bother to write those babies’ names down in her book. It was fifteen dollars a day and they had to be in reasonable health. Even so the occasional mischievous illness would arise and empty the place out.

Photograph (detail) by Philip Montgomery
Article
A Prayer’s Chance·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Mrs. B’s Baby Village Day Care was on a frontage road between a mattress wholesaler and a knife outlet. There were six or so babies as regulars and another one or two on weekends when their parents were passing through looking for work. They wouldn’t find work, of course, all the security positions were full, the timber and ore had all been taken under the active-stewardship program, and the closest new start-up industry was the geothermal field hundreds of miles away. Mrs. B didn’t even bother to write those babies’ names down in her book. It was fifteen dollars a day and they had to be in reasonable health. Even so the occasional mischievous illness would arise and empty the place out.

Photograph (detail) by Robin Hammond/NOOR
Article
Bee-Brained·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Mrs. B’s Baby Village Day Care was on a frontage road between a mattress wholesaler and a knife outlet. There were six or so babies as regulars and another one or two on weekends when their parents were passing through looking for work. They wouldn’t find work, of course, all the security positions were full, the timber and ore had all been taken under the active-stewardship program, and the closest new start-up industry was the geothermal field hundreds of miles away. Mrs. B didn’t even bother to write those babies’ names down in her book. It was fifteen dollars a day and they had to be in reasonable health. Even so the occasional mischievous illness would arise and empty the place out.

Illustration (detail) by Eda Akaltun. Source photograph of Jairam Hathwar at the 2016 Scripps National Spelling Bee © Pete Marovich/UPI/Newscom
Article
My First Car·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Mrs. B’s Baby Village Day Care was on a frontage road between a mattress wholesaler and a knife outlet. There were six or so babies as regulars and another one or two on weekends when their parents were passing through looking for work. They wouldn’t find work, of course, all the security positions were full, the timber and ore had all been taken under the active-stewardship program, and the closest new start-up industry was the geothermal field hundreds of miles away. Mrs. B didn’t even bother to write those babies’ names down in her book. It was fifteen dollars a day and they had to be in reasonable health. Even so the occasional mischievous illness would arise and empty the place out.

Illustration by Katherine Streeter

Percentage of Russians who believe the West is attempting “to weaken Russia with its economic advice”:

54

African elephants can distinguish the gender, age, and ethnicity of a human speaker from voice alone.

Three bodies were tossed from a low-flying plane in the Sinaloa state of Mexico.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Who Goes Nazi?

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

By

"It is an interesting and somewhat macabre parlor game to play at a large gathering of one’s acquaintances: to speculate who in a showdown would go Nazi. By now, I think I know. I have gone through the experience many times—in Germany, in Austria, and in France. I have come to know the types: the born Nazis, the Nazis whom democracy itself has created, the certain-to-be fellow-travelers. And I also know those who never, under any conceivable circumstances, would become Nazis."

Subscribe Today