Washington Babylon — September 20, 2007, 5:16 pm

Bogus Human Rights Group Objects to Being Called Bogus Human Rights Group

A few days ago I wrote about a visit to Washington, D.C., by what I described as a bogus human rights group from Azerbaijan. The group, called the Association for Civil Society Development in Azerbaijan (ACSDA), was making the rounds here in the capitol and held a media event at the National Press Club.

After my piece was published I received a message from Bob Lawrence, who heads the lobbying firm that organized the visit. “There are,” he said, “some justifiably hurt feelings here.” Lawrence also said that he would try to put me in touch with members of the group, but they declined to speak with me, becoming particularly sensitive after my original story was picked up by Azeri newspapers. Lawrence defended the group as genuinely independent activists and thinkers.

But Peter Zalmayev, who formerly was a program manager at the International League for Human Rights and who has worked closely with major independent Azeri social and political groups, said my original story had it right. The ACSDA, he said, claims to be an umbrella organization representing a number of reputable groups–but many of them are simply shell organizations, sometimes just one-man shows. “It’s a front operation,” said Zalmayev, “that helps the government counter criticism from legitimate non-governmental organizations.”

Zalmayev described the visiting Azeri outfit as a “GONGO,” or Government Organized Non Governmental Organization. “These date to the Soviet era,” he told me. “ There were genuine dissidents and the Communist governments learned quickly to counterattack with GONGOs. You see a lot of them today [in Eastern Europe], especially Russia.”

One of the groups that makes up the ACSDA is called Human Rights in the XXI Century. Even a cursory glance at the group’s web site makes clear that it serves as an apologist for the crooked, repressive regime of Ilham Aliyev. The current U.S. State Department report on global human rights says: “The government’s human rights record remained poor, and it continued to commit numerous abuses . . . Arbitrary arrest and detention, particularly of individuals considered by the government to be political opponents, and lengthy pretrial detention continued. The government continued to imprison persons for politically motivated reasons.”

Yet the hacks at Human Rights in the XXI Century essentially argue (in a fine throwback to the Soviet era) that the whole issue of political prisoners, and repression in general, has been manufactured by enemies of the state. “Since 1995, Azerbaijan has become stronger and continued the democratic development,” says a report on the group’s website. “The government of Azerbaijan abolished the censorship of press, death penalty, and established a legislative basis for the creation and activity of democratic institutions.” Outsiders, says the report, believe that Azeri government authorities lock up their foes and generally conduct “uncivilized struggle against its political opponents.” But that’s just propaganda from “leading figures of the parties which are in the opposition to the present government.”

The report identifies a number of these traitors as social democrats and accuses them of conspiring with political allies in Europe to spread false information about Azerbaijan. “Is there anyone who is not aware of the mutual cooperation of the world’s social democracy movement?” the report asks. More ominously, the report continues, a “tragic event” occurred in Europe. “A person classified as a ‘political prisoner’ and released from punishment” due to complaints of international human rights groups “murdered a young family of three (husband, wife and the baby) with the purpose of robbery.”

Another of the ACSDA members is called the Caspian Partnership for the Future. If you go to that group’s website. You’ll find headshots that look like they were taken from personal ads, and you’ll also learn that its president, Rustam F. Mammadov worked from 1997 to 2004 as:

Apparatus of the President of the Azerbaijan Republic, Social-Political Relations Department as the head of the Section for Azerbaijani Diaspora Affairs and NGO’s.

It sounds like a hell of a job.

I could continue for quite a while but it hardly seems necessary. I am grateful that Mr. Lawrence contacted me, but with all due respect it looks to me like he’s trying to put lipstick on a pig.

Share
Single Page

More from Ken Silverstein:

Commentary November 17, 2015, 6:41 pm

Shaky Foundations

The Clintons’ so-called charitable enterprise has served as a vehicle to launder money and to enrich family friends.

From the November 2013 issue

Dirty South

The foul legacy of Louisiana oil

Perspective October 23, 2013, 8:00 am

On Brining and Dining

How pro-oil Louisiana politicians have shaped American environmental policy

Get access to 168 years of
Harper’s for only $23.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

May 2019

Where Our New World Begins

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Truce

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Lost at Sea

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Unexpected

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Article
No Joe!·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

In the heart of the US Capitol there’s a small men’s room with an uplifting Franklin Delano Roo­sevelt quotation above the door. Making use of the facilities there after lunch in the nearby House dining room about a year ago, I found myself standing next to Trent Lott. Once a mighty power in the building as Senate Republican leader, he had been forced to resign his post following some imprudently affectionate references to his fellow Republican senator, arch-segregationist Strom Thurmond. Now he was visiting the Capitol as a lucratively employed lobbyist.

Article
Lost at Sea·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

A few miles north of San Francisco, off the coast of Sausalito, is Richardson Bay, a saltwater estuary where roughly one hundred people live out of sight from the world. Known as anchor-outs, they make their homes a quarter mile from the shore, on abandoned and unseaworthy vessels, doing their best, with little or no money, to survive. Life is not easy. There is always a storm on the way, one that might capsize their boats and consign their belongings to the bottom of the bay. But when the water is calm and the harbormaster is away, the anchor-­outs call their world Shangri-lito. They row from one boat to the next, repairing their homes with salvaged scrap wood and trading the herbs and vegetables they’ve grown in ten-gallon buckets on their decks. If a breeze is blowing, the air fills with the clamoring of jib hanks. Otherwise, save for a passing motorboat or a moment of distant chatter, there is only the sound of the birds: the sparrows that hop along the wreckage of catamarans, the egrets that hunt herring in the eelgrass, and the terns that circle in the sky above.

Article
The Unexpected·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

1. As closing time at Moscow’s Tretyakov Gallery approached on May 25, 2018, Igor Podporin, a balding thirty-seven-year-old with sunken eyes, circled the Russian history room. The elderly museum attendees shooed him toward the exit, but Podporin paused by a staircase, turned, and rushed back toward the Russian painter Ilya Repin’s 1885 work Ivan the Terrible and His Son Ivan on November 16, 1581. He picked up a large metal pole—part of a barrier meant to keep viewers at a distance—and smashed the painting’s protective glass, landing three more strikes across Ivan’s son’s torso before guards managed to subdue him. …
Article
The Truce·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

When I met Raúl Mijango, in a courtroom in San Salvador, he was in shackles, awaiting trial. He was paunchier than in the photos I’d seen of him, bloated from diabetes, and his previously salt-and-pepper goatee had turned fully white. The masked guard who was escorting him stood nearby, and national news cameras filmed us from afar. Despite facing the possibility of a long prison sentence, Mijango seemed relaxed, smiling easily as we spoke. “Bolívar, Fidel, Gandhi, and Mandela have also passed through this school,” he told me, “and I hope that some of what they learned during their years in prison we should learn as well.”

Article
Slash Fictions·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

1. As closing time at Moscow’s Tretyakov Gallery approached on May 25, 2018, Igor Podporin, a balding thirty-seven-year-old with sunken eyes, circled the Russian history room. The elderly museum attendees shooed him toward the exit, but Podporin paused by a staircase, turned, and rushed back toward the Russian painter Ilya Repin’s 1885 work Ivan the Terrible and His Son Ivan on November 16, 1581. He picked up a large metal pole—part of a barrier meant to keep viewers at a distance—and smashed the painting’s protective glass, landing three more strikes across Ivan’s son’s torso before guards managed to subdue him. Initially, police presented Podporin’s attack as an alcohol-fueled outburst and released a video confession in which he admitted to having knocked back two shots of vodka in the museum cafeteria beforehand. But when Podporin entered court four days later, dressed in the same black Columbia fleece, turquoise T-shirt, and navy-blue cargo pants he had been arrested in, he offered a different explanation for the attack. The painting, Podporin declared, was a “lie.” With that accusation, he thrust himself into a centuries-old debate about the legacy of Russia’s first tsar, a debate that has reignited during Vladimir Putin’s reign. The dispute boils down to one deceptively simple question: Was Ivan really so terrible?

Cost of renting a giant panda from the Chinese government, per day:

$1,500

A recent earthquake in Chile was found to have shifted the city of Concepción ten feet to the west, shortened Earth’s days by 1.26 microseconds, and shifted the planet’s axis by nearly three inches.

A new study showed that, between 2011 and 2018, the number of human feces left on San Francisco streets increased by more than 400 percent.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Happiness Is a Worn Gun

By

“Nowadays, most states let just about anybody who wants a concealed-handgun permit have one; in seventeen states, you don’t even have to be a resident. Nobody knows exactly how many Americans carry guns, because not all states release their numbers, and even if they did, not all permit holders carry all the time. But it’s safe to assume that as many as 6 million Americans are walking around with firearms under their clothes.”

Subscribe Today