The Minds of Others·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The art of persuasion in the age of Trump
Illustration (detail) by Lincoln Agnew

= Subscribers only. Sign in here. Subscribe here.

Within Reach·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The transgender community fights for health care
Illustration by Taylor Callery

= Subscribers only. Sign in here. Subscribe here.

Before the Deluge·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

How Washington sealed Puerto Rico’s fate
Photograph from Puerto Rico by Christopher Gregory

= Subscribers only. Sign in here. Subscribe here.

Monumental Error·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Will New York City finally tear down a statue?
Illustration by Steve Brodner

= Subscribers only. Sign in here. Subscribe here.

After losing their savings in the stock market crash of 2008, seniors Barb and Chuck find seasonal employment at Amazon fulfillment centers.

Chance that a Silicon Valley technology company started since 1995 was founded by Indian or Chinese immigrants:

1 in 3

A gay penguin couple in China’s Polar Land zoo were ostracized by other penguins and then placed in a separate enclosure after they made repeated attempts to steal the eggs of straight penguin couples and replace them with stones.

Trump’s former chief strategist, whom Trump said had “lost his mind,” issued a statement saying that Trump’s son did not commit treason; the US ambassador to the United Nations announced that “no one questions” Trump’s mental stability; and the director of the CIA said that Trump, who requested “killer graphics” in his intelligence briefings, is able to read.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

Art — January 16, 2018, 4:04 pm

Caption: “Motherhood, 1938,” a photograph by Boris Ignatovich, whose work is on view this week at Nailya Alexander Gallery, in New York City. Credit: © Boris Ignatovich. Courtesy Nailya Alexander Gallery, New York City

Commentary — January 16, 2018, 3:28 pm

Angels and Wildfires

“Dying for a dollar an hour while fighting to keep someone’s home from burning is entirely constitutional.”

Weekly Review — January 9, 2018, 8:30 am

Weekly Review

The White House press secretary said that US president Donald Trump “puts in long hours” and is “one of the hardest workers” she has “ever seen,” and an analysis from leaked copies of Trump’s private schedule found that he often begins his workday at 11 am and ends around 6 pm, when he reportedly retires to his private residence to watch cable news on three televisions, eat a cheeseburger, and tweet.[1][2][3] “Much work to be done!” Trump tweeted.[4] Trump then tweeted that he had created “jobs, jobs, jobs” since becoming president, and it was reported that Trump plans to bolster job creation by …

Art, Monday Gallery — January 8, 2018, 11:41 am

An untitled photograph by Mike Slack, from The Transverse Path (or Nature’s Little Secret), published in November by The Ice Plant. Courtesy the artist

Postcard — January 5, 2018, 12:18 pm

The Kids of Kyangwali

Growing up in a refugee settlement in western Uganda

Art, Monday Gallery — January 3, 2018, 1:00 pm

So We Cross the Dark, a mixed-media work by Mayme Kratz, whose work is on view this week at Dolby Chadwick Gallery, in San Francisco. Courtesy the artist and Dolby Chadwick Gallery, San Francisco

THE CURRENT ISSUE

February 2018

The Bodies in The Forest

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Minds of Others

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Modern Despots

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Before the Deluge

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Notes to Self

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Within Reach

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content Subscribe Today

HARPER’S FINEST

Report — From the June 2013 issue

How to Make Your Own AR-15

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

By

"Gun owners have long been the hypochondriacs of American politics. Over the past twenty years, the gun-rights movement has won just about every battle it has fought; states have passed at least a hundred laws loosening gun restrictions since President Obama took office. Yet the National Rifle Association has continued to insist that government confiscation of privately owned firearms is nigh. The NRA’s alarmism helped maintain an active membership, but the strategy was risky: sooner or later, gun guys might have realized that they’d been had. Then came the shootings at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado, and at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, followed swiftly by the nightmare the NRA had been promising for decades: a dedicated push at every level of government for new gun laws. The gun-rights movement was now that most insufferable of species: a hypochondriac taken suddenly, seriously ill."

Subscribe Today