Weekly Review — June 12, 2018, 11:56 am

Weekly Review

Kim Jong-un and Donald Trump meet at a former POW site, Jeff Sessions denies asylum to victims of domestic abuse and gang violence, and the National Sheriff Association announces a new initiative to protect pets

The leaders of Canada, Italy, Germany, France, Japan, the UK, the United States, and 12 other countries gathered for the annual G7 summit, held this year in Charlevoix, Quebec.[1] US president Donald Trump arrived late to a meeting on gender equality, missed a meeting with French president Emmanuel Macron, refused to sign the summit’s joint communiqué shortly after agreeing to sign it, and said that Russian president Vladimir Putin should have been invited.[2][3][4][5] Trump left the summit early, after less than 24 hours in Canada, in order to travel to Singapore for what he described as a “get-to-know-you situation” with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un at a five-star resort on the island of Sentosa, which was once known as the Island of Death from Behind for housing a Japanese execution site during World War II and now has a theme park and two golf courses.[6] Doug Ford, a label and packaging magnate who is the brother of Toronto’s late mayor Rob Ford, who was once filmed smoking crack, was elected premier of Ontario, Canada’s most populous province.[7] In Surrey, British Columbia, it was reported that feral peacocks were attacking cars after seeing their own reflections.[8]

Austria’s government announced that it would close seven mosques, and the government of Bavaria, Germany, made it mandatory that every public building display a Christian cross at their entrance, and said that it would consider using private jets to deport migrants seeking asylum.[9][10][11] US attorney general Jeff Sessions ordered federal immigration judges to “generally” deny “claims by aliens pertaining to domestic violence or gang violence perpetrated by non-governmental actors,” and to complete a quota of 700 cases a year; the US government plans to transfer 1,600 detained immigrants, including asylum seekers, to federal prisons; and an Ecuadorean pizza-delivery man was arrested after trying to deliver pizza to a military base in New York.[12][13][14] It was reported that children had been separated from their parents while attempting to cross the US border in 1,768 cases over 17 months, and a Senator touring a detention facility said that children were being kept in “big cages.”[15][16] A Massachusetts kindergarten teacher rewrote “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” with the lyrics “Lockdown, lockdown, lock the door. Shut the lights off, say no more” as part of a drill for school shootings.[17] A two-year-old boy died after being shot by his 13-year-old brother in Ohio; a four-year-old boy was shot in South Carolina after playing with a gun he found under a mattress; a 10-year-old boy was shot while playing in his yard in Mississippi; a two-year-old boy was shot in the head and a nine-year-old boy was shot in the stomach while shooting targets in Tennessee; a four-year-old boy was shot at a gas station in Missouri; a five-year-old boy was shot while sitting on a porch in Louisiana; a five-year-old boy was shot in Pennsylvania; a six-year-old boy in Kentucky died when a gun he was playing with went off; a 12-year-old girl died after being shot by two teenagers in Georgia; five-year-old boy was shot by his eight-year-old brother and seven people were shot at a child’s birthday party in Illinois; and a ten-year-old boy was shot in the head at a birthday party in Virginia.[18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29] NRA Family, the National Rifle Association’s website “for families and beginning shooters of all ages,” posted a “Fun Friday Quiz” titled “Which Rifle Are You?”[30]

A member of the National Guard was arrested after leading police on a two-hour chase in a stolen armored vehicle in Virginia.[31] Police in Mesa, Arizona, released a video showing a group of police officers punching and kneeing an unarmed 33-year-old black man because he wouldn’t sit down on the floor; a 24-year-old black man in Chicago was killed after being shot in the back by police; and the National Sheriff Association announced a new program to teach police how to reduce the use of lethal force against pets.[32][33][34] A pastor conducting a baptism in a lake in Ethiopia was killed by a crocodile, a woman in Florida was dragged into a lake by an alligator while she was walking her dogs, and a cashier on her break at a Florida Home Depot was attacked in the parking lot by a spider monkey named Spanky.[35][36][37] It was reported that Chinese demand for donkey skins was causing a decline in Kenyan donkey populations.[38] A 340-ton machine in Tennessee that can calculate 200 quadrillion mathematical equations per second overtook a Chinese mainframe to become the world’s fastest supercomputer, and it was reported that researchers in Germany were developing a robot that gives good hugs.[39][40]

Sign up and get the Weekly Review delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to Harper’s Magazine today!

Share
Single Page

More from Sharon J. Riley:

Weekly Review April 17, 2018, 2:23 pm

Weekly Review

Trump fires missiles at Syria, a former FBI director likens Trump to a Mafia boss, and New Yorkers mistake a racoon for a tiger

Weekly Review March 20, 2018, 1:38 pm

Weekly Review

Donald Trump says teachers should carry guns, a school resource officer mistakenly fires his gun at a middle school in Virginia, and the United States receives its worst-ever ranking on the World Happiness Report

Weekly Review April 26, 2017, 4:46 pm

Weekly Review

Marine Le Pen qualifies for the second round of the French presidential election, Bill O’Reilly is fired from Fox News, and Russia announces it is not “creating a Terminator.”

Get access to 169 years of
Harper’s for only $23.99

United States Canada

CATEGORIES

THE CURRENT ISSUE

June 2019

Downstream

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Stonewall at Fifty

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The Maid’s Story

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Is Poverty Necessary?

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

view Table Content

FEATURED ON HARPERS.ORG

Post

Left to the tender mercies of the state, a group of veterans and their families continue to reside in a shut-down town

Article
Stonewall at Fifty·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

Early in the morning on June 28, 1969, New York police raided the Stonewall Inn at 53 Christopher Street, the city’s most popular gay bar. The police had raided Stonewall frequently since its opening two years before, but the local precinct usually tipped off the management and arrived in the early evening. This time they came unannounced, during peak hours. They swept through the bar, checking I.D.s and arresting anyone wearing attire that was not “appropriate to one’s gender,” carrying out the law of the time. Eyewitness accounts differ on what turned the unruly scene explosive. Whatever the inciting event, patrons and a growing crowd on the street began throwing coins, bottles, and bricks at the police, who were forced to retreat into the bar and call in the riot squad.

Article
Downstream·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

The squat warehouse at Miami’s 5th Street Terminal was nearly obscured by merchandise: used car engines; tangles of coat hangers; bicycles bound together with cellophane; stacks of wheelbarrows; cases of Powerade and bottled water; a bag of sprouting onions atop a secondhand Whirlpool refrigerator; and, above all, mattresses—shrink-wrapped and bare, spotless and streaked with dust, heaped in every corner of the lot—twins, queens, kings. All this and more was bound for Port-de-Paix, a remote city in northwestern Haiti.

When I first arrived at the warehouse on a sunny morning last May, a dozen pickup trucks and U-Hauls were waiting outside, piled high with used furniture. Nearby, rows of vehicles awaiting export were crammed together along a dirt strip separating the street from the shipyard, where a stately blue cargo vessel was being loaded with goods.

Article
Is Poverty Necessary?·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

In 1989 I published a book about a plutonium-producing nuclear complex in En­gland, on the coast of the Irish Sea. The plant is called Sellafield now. In 1957, when it was the site of the most serious nuclear accident then known to have occurred, the plant was called Windscale. While working on the book, I learned from reports in the British press that in the course of normal functioning it released significant quantities of waste—plutonium and other transuranic elements—into the environment and the adjacent sea. There were reports of high cancer rates. The plant had always been wholly owned by the British government. I believe at some point the government bought it from itself. Privatization was very well thought of at the time, and no buyer could be found for this vast monument to dinosaur modernism.

Back then, I shared the American assumption that such things were dealt with responsibly, or at least rationally, at least in the West outside the United States. Windscale/Sellafield is by no means the anomaly I thought it was then. But the fact that a government entrusted with the well-being of a crowded island would visit this endless, silent disaster on its own people was striking to me, and I spent almost a decade trying to understand it. I learned immediately that the motives were economic. What of all this noxious efflux they did not spill they sold into a global market.

Article
What it Means to Be Alive·

= Subscribers only.
Sign in here.
Subscribe here.

My father decided that he would end his life by throwing himself from the top of the parking garage at the Nashville airport, which he later told me had seemed like the best combination of convenience—that is, he could get there easily and unnoticed—and sufficiency—that is, he was pretty sure it was tall enough to do the job. I never asked him which other venues he considered and rejected before settling on this plan. He probably did not actually use the word “best.” It was Mother’s Day, 2013.

Cost of renting a giant panda from the Chinese government, per day:

$1,500

A recent earthquake in Chile was found to have shifted the city of Concepción ten feet to the west, shortened Earth’s days by 1.26 microseconds, and shifted the planet’s axis by nearly three inches.

The United States is nearly drought-free for the first time in decades and is experiencing unprecedented levels of flooding.

Subscribe to the Weekly Review newsletter. Don’t worry, we won’t sell your email address!

HARPER’S FINEST

Happiness Is a Worn Gun

By

“Nowadays, most states let just about anybody who wants a concealed-handgun permit have one; in seventeen states, you don’t even have to be a resident. Nobody knows exactly how many Americans carry guns, because not all states release their numbers, and even if they did, not all permit holders carry all the time. But it’s safe to assume that as many as 6 million Americans are walking around with firearms under their clothes.”

Subscribe Today