Memento Mori

Memento Mori — May 23, 2018, 10:15 am

Philip Roth (1933–2018)

Remembering Philip Roth

Memento Mori — May 15, 2018, 11:35 am

Tom Wolfe (1930–2018)

Remembering Tom Wolfe

Memento Mori — September 5, 2017, 3:03 pm

John Ashbery (1927–2017)

Remembering John Ashbery

Memento Mori — August 24, 2017, 12:19 pm

Kim Wall (1987–2017)

Remembering Kim Wall

Memento Mori — March 22, 2017, 2:01 pm

Remembering Charis Conn

A story by former Harper’s Magazine editor Charis Conn, who died on Monday.

Memento Mori — January 3, 2017, 2:09 pm

John Berger (1926–2017)

We mourn the recent passing of John Berger, a long-time and much valued contributor to Harper’s Magazine.

Memento Mori — September 2, 2014, 5:33 pm

Charles Bowden (1945–2014)

We at Harper’s Magazine are grieved to learn of the sudden passing of long-time contributor Charles Bowden. His articles for the magazine appeared from the 1980s through the early years of the present century, and they could hardly be rivaled for their brutal honesty and intensity. His memoir, “Torch Song,” from the August 1998 issue, is available to read for free, and subscribers can read all the rest of his superb work from the magazine here.

Memento Mori — March 11, 2014, 1:51 pm

Matthew Power (1974–2014)

Remembering a contributor and friend

Memento Mori — December 6, 2013, 12:02 pm

The Leaving of Madiba

Saying goodbye to Nelson Mandela, beloved fighter, visionary, and king

Memento Mori — October 15, 2013, 6:03 pm

Remembering David Sullivan

On the remarkable life of the subject of “The Man Who Saves You from Yourself”

Memento Mori — January 14, 2013, 4:30 pm

Remembering Evan S. Connell (1924–2013)

On the life-drawings of an American literary master

Memento Mori — December 28, 2012, 10:00 am

Larry L. King (1929–2012)

R.I.P. Larry L. King, Harper's Magazine contributor from 1965 to 1971

Memento Mori — September 15, 2008, 11:46 am

David Foster Wallace

In memoriam. September 1989 Everything is Green December 1991 Tennis, Trigonometry, Tornadoes: A Midwestern boyhood August 1992 Rabbit Resurrected September 1993 The Awakening of My Interest in Annular Systems July 1994 Ticket to the Fair (Video—Reading in 2000) January 1996 Shipping Out January 1998 The Depressed Person July 1998 Laughing with Kafka October 1998 Brief Interviews with Hideous Men April 2001 Tense Present: Democracy, English, and the wars over usage February 2008 The Compliance Branch

Memento Mori — February 29, 2008, 2:20 pm

William F. Buckley Jr.

Douglas Martin, “William F. Buckley Jr., 82, Dies; Sesquipedalian Spark of Right,” the New York Times, February 28, 2008: William F. Buckley Jr., who marshaled polysyllabic exuberance, famously arched eyebrows and a refined, perspicacious mind to elevate conservatism to the center of American political discourse, died Wednesday at his home in Stamford, Conn. He was 82. In 1955, Mr. Buckley started National Review as a voice for “the disciples of truth, who defend the organic moral order,” with a $100,000 gift from his father and $290,000 from outside donors. The first issue, which came out in November, claimed the publication …

Memento Mori — December 5, 2007, 10:20 am

Elizabeth Hardwick, 1916–2007

Elizabeth Hardwick died Sunday in Manhattan at the age of ninety-one. Between 1959 and 1969, she contributed essays and criticism to Harper’s Magazine, for a time taking over the New Books column. Her name is often mentioned lately in connection with her polemic “The Decline of Book Reviewing,” part of a 1959 special section on “Writing in America” that also featured Alfred Kazin, Kingsley Amis, and Stanley Kunitz. Hardwick tilted at “the unaccountable sluggishness of the New York Times and Herald Tribune Sunday book sections”: In America, now, oblivion, literary failure, obscurity, neglect—all the great moments of artistic tragedy and …

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On February 5, 2019, the president of the United States (a certain Donald Trump) in his State of the Union speech warned of “migrant caravans and accused Mexican cities of busing migrants to the border ‘to bring them up to our country in areas where there is little border protection.’ ”? Wishing to see the border for myself, I decided to visit Arizona, where my ignorance of local conditions might save me from prejudgment.

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After years of post-Brexit uncertainty, Scotland’s independence movement has become resurgent

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On a November Saturday in 1990, Pam went over to Joe’s place to listen to records. It was raining in sheets that whipped around the corners of buildings and blowing so hard that women in heels were taking men’s arms to cross the street. Cars were plowing bow waves through puddles of scum.

As Joe was letting Pam into the apartment, a man emerged from the bedroom with a square sheet of black plastic in his hand and said, “Hey, man, you have the Sassy Sonic Youth flexi!”

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Discussed in this essay:

Semicolon: The Past, Present, and Future of a Misunderstood Mark, by Cecelia Watson. Ecco. 224 pages. $19.99.

Four Men Shaking: Searching for Sanity with Samuel Beckett, Norman Mailer, and My Perfect Zen Teacher, by Lawrence Shainberg. Shambhala. 144 pages. $16.95.

Japanese Tales of Lafcadio Hearn, edited by Andrei Codrescu. Princeton University Press. 224 pages. $22.95.

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The Trials of Vasily Grossman·

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Discussed in this essay:

Stalingrad, by Vasily Grossman. Translated by Robert Chandler and Elizabeth Chandler. New York Review Books. 1,088 pages. $27.95.

Vasily Grossman and the Soviet Century, by Alexandra Popoff. Yale University Press. 424 pages. $32.50.

Life and Fate, by Vasily Grossman. Translated by Robert Chandler. New York Review Books. 904 pages. $24.95.

An Armenian Sketchbook, by Vasily Grossman. Translated by Robert Chandler and Elizabeth Chandler. New York Review Books. 160 pages. $14.95.

Cost of renting a giant panda from the Chinese government, per day:

$1,500

A recent earthquake in Chile was found to have shifted the city of Concepción ten feet to the west, shortened Earth’s days by 1.26 microseconds, and shifted the planet’s axis by nearly three inches.

A swarm of ladybugs in California was so large that it appeared on the National Weather Service’s radar.

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