A Discussion with John R. MacArthur and Thomas Frank on the Obama Mandate and the Future of the Left | Harper's Magazine

Sign in to access Harper’s Magazine

Need to create a login? Want to change your email address or password? Forgot your password?

  1. Sign in to Customer Care using your account number or postal address.
  2. Select Email/Password Information.
  3. Enter your new information and click on Save My Changes.

Locked out of your account? Get help here.

Subscribers can find additional help here.

Not a subscriber? Subscribe today!

Get Access to Print and Digital for $23.99.
Subscribe for Full Access
Get Access to Print and Digital for $23.99.
[Official Business]

A Discussion with John R. MacArthur and Thomas Frank on the Obama Mandate and the Future of the Left

Adjust

Join Harper’s publisher John R. MacArthur and columnist Thomas Frank at the New York Society for Ethical Culture on Tuesday, December 4

Join Harper’s Magazine publisher John R. MacArthur and columnist Thomas Frank at the New York Society for Ethical Culture on Tuesday, December 4, for a discussion of liberalism in America and what progressives can expect now that Barack Obama has been elected to a second term as president. MacArthur and Frank will be joined by moderator Dr. Joseph Chuman for a vital conversation about the state of our democracy and the obstructions that prevent any president from enacting truly progressive change.

The conversation will draw on MacArthur’s book The Outrageous Barriers to Democracy in America: Or, Why a Progressive Presidency Is Impossible, in which he argues that the country is in a political ice age, frozen by two parties of entrenched, well-funded elites. Pity the Billionaire author Tom Frank will discuss what the acceptance of a “grand bargain” would mean for Obama’s second term, the topic of his column in the January 2013 issue of Harper’s.

The event is free to the public. A donation of $10 is suggested. If you RSVP with a donation of $20, you’ll also get the current issue of Harper’s Magazine and a copy of You Can’t Be President.

More from

More