American doctors revealed that they had made an infertile woman pregnant using nuclear transfer, a technique similar to cloning that involves taking genetic material from the mother's fertilized yet defective egg and putting it in a healthy egg from another woman that lacks a nucleus. Working in China, one of the few countries where the procedure is legal, the doctors managed to hear the heartbeat of three embryos, though none ultimately survived. | Harper's Magazine

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American doctors revealed that they had made an infertile woman pregnant using nuclear transfer, a technique similar to cloning that involves taking genetic material from the mother’s fertilized yet defective egg and putting it in a healthy egg from another woman that lacks a nucleus. Working in China, one of the few countries where the procedure is legal, the doctors managed to hear the heartbeat of three embryos, though none ultimately survived.

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American doctors revealed that they had made an infertile woman pregnant using nuclear transfer, a technique similar to cloning that involves taking genetic material from the mother’s fertilized yet defective egg and putting it in a healthy egg from another woman that lacks a nucleus. Working in China, one of the few countries where the procedure is legal, the doctors managed to hear the heartbeat of three embryos, though none ultimately survived.

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