Astronomers and other scientists descended on Washington, D.C., to attend the Planetary Defense Conference and to compose a white paper on the threat to Earth from asteroids; it was hoped that the document might persuade Congress, which authorized NASA in 2005 to search for space objects larger than 140 meters, to provide funding for the project, which is aimed at preventing the deaths of billions of people that a collision with a moderate-size asteroid might cause. A study found that Venus is the best place for a telescope, preferably infrared, dedicated to spotting such asteroids. | Harper's Magazine

Sign in to access Harper’s Magazine

Need to create a login? Want to change your email address or password? Forgot your password?

  1. Sign in to Customer Care using your account number or postal address.
  2. Select Email/Password Information.
  3. Enter your new information and click on Save My Changes.

Locked out of your account? Get help here.

Subscribers can find additional help here.

Not a subscriber? Subscribe today!

Get Access to Print and Digital for $23.99.
Subscribe for Full Access
Get Access to Print and Digital for $23.99.

Astronomers and other scientists descended on Washington, D.C., to attend the Planetary Defense Conference and to compose a white paper on the threat to Earth from asteroids; it was hoped that the document might persuade Congress, which authorized NASA in 2005 to search for space objects larger than 140 meters, to provide funding for the project, which is aimed at preventing the deaths of billions of people that a collision with a moderate-size asteroid might cause. A study found that Venus is the best place for a telescope, preferably infrared, dedicated to spotting such asteroids.

Adjust

Astronomers and other scientists descended on Washington, D.C., to attend the Planetary Defense Conference and to compose a white paper on the threat to Earth from asteroids; it was hoped that the document might persuade Congress, which authorized NASA in 2005 to search for space objects larger than 140 meters, to provide funding for the project, which is aimed at preventing the deaths of billions of people that a collision with a moderate-size asteroid might cause. A study found that Venus is the best place for a telescope, preferably infrared, dedicated to spotting such asteroids.

More from

More