Marine biologists, by failing to clean their submersible, accidentally introduced Californian mollusks to the deep seas off Washington, and possibly also introduced copepods who prey on mollusk gonads. "It's really embarrassing," said a team member. "But it didn't seem like a clear and present danger." | Harper's Magazine

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Marine biologists, by failing to clean their submersible, accidentally introduced Californian mollusks to the deep seas off Washington, and possibly also introduced copepods who prey on mollusk gonads. “It’s really embarrassing,” said a team member. “But it didn’t seem like a clear and present danger.”

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Marine biologists, by failing to clean their submersible, accidentally introduced Californian mollusks to the deep seas off Washington, and possibly also introduced copepods who prey on mollusk gonads. “It’s really embarrassing,” said a team member. “But it didn’t seem like a clear and present danger.”

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